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HENRY WARD BEECHER
American Congregational clergyman, religious writer and reformer
(1813 - 1887)
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Life would be a perpetual flea-hunt if a man were obliged to run down all the innuendoes, inveracities, insinuations and suspicions which are uttered against him.
      - [Slander]

Like the cellar-growing vine is the Christian who lives in the darkness and bondage of fear. But let him go forth, with the liberty of God, into the light of love, and he will be like the plant in the field, healthy, robust, and joyful.
      - [Christian]

Living is death; dying is life. We are not what we appear to be. On this side of the grave we are exiles, on that citizens; on this side orphans, on that children; on this side captives, on that freemen; on this side disguised, unknown, on that disclosed and proclaimed as the sons of God.
      - [Death]

Love cannot endure indifference. It needs to be wanted. Like a lamp, it needs to be fed out of the oil of another's heart, or its flame burns low.
      - [Love]

Love is more just than justice.
      - [Love]

Love is ownership.
      - [Love]

Love is the medicine of all moral evil. By it the world is to be cured of sin.
      - [Love]

Love is the river of life in this world. Think not that ye know it who stand at the little tinkling rill, the first small fountain. Not until you have gone through the rocky gorges, and not lost the stream; not until you nave gone through the meadow, and the stream has widened and deepened until fleets could ride on its bosom; not until beyond the meadow you have come to the unfathomable ocean, and poured your treasures into its depths--not until then can you know what love is.
      - [Love]

Love is the wine of existence.
      - [Love]

Love without faith is as bad as faith without love.
      - [Love]

Man is that name of power which rises above them all, and gives to every one the right to be that which God meant he should be.
      - [Man]

Many men want wealth,--not a competence alone, but a live-story competence. Everything subserves this; and religion they would like as a sort of lightning-rod to their houses, to ward off by and by the bolts of Divine wrath.
      - [Wealth]

Many will say, "I can find God without the help of the Bible, or church, or minister." Very well. Do so if you can. The Ferry Company would feel no jealousy of a man who should prefer to swim to New York. Let him do so if he is able, and we will talk about it on the other shore; but probably trying to swim would be the thing that would bring him quickest to the boat. So God would have no jealousy of a man's going to heaven without the aid of the Bible, or church, or minister; but let him try to do so, and it will be the surest way to bring him back to them for assistance.
      - [Bible]

May we be satisfied with nothing that shall not have in it something of immortality.
      - [Immortality]

medicine.
      - [Joy]

Memory can glean, but can never renew. It brings us joys faint as is the perfume of the flowers, faded and dried, of the summer that is gone.
      - [Memory]

Men do not avail themselves of the riches of God's grace. They love to nurse their cares, and seem as uneasy without some fret as an old friar would be without his hair girdle. They are commanded to cast their cares upon the Lord, but even when they attempt it, they do not fail to catch them up again, and think it meritorious to walk burdened.
      - [Care]

Men must read for amusement as well as for knowledge.
      - [Reading]

Men of dissolute lives have little incentive to look forward to the hopes and glories of immortality. A due conception of these would be incompatible with such a life.
      - [Immortality]

Men think God is destroying them because he is tuning them. The violinist screws up the key till the tense cord sounds the concert pitch; but it is not to break it, but to use it tune-fully, that he stretches the string upon the musical rack.
      - [Adversity]

Men who neglect. Christ, and try to win heaven through moralities, are like sailors at sea in a storm, who pull, some at the bowsprit and some at the mainmast, but never touch the helm.
      - [Christ]

Men will imitate and admire his unmoved firmness, his inflexible conscience for the right; and yet his gentleness, as tender as a woman's, his moderation of spirit, which not all the heat of party could inflame, nor all the jars and disturbances of this country shake out of its place: I swear you to an emulation of his justice, his moderation, and his mercy.
      - [Lincoln's Birthday]

Men will let you abuse them if only you will make them laugh.
      - [Laughter]

Mirth is God's medicine. Everybody ought to bathe in it. Grim care, moroseness, anxiety,--all this rust of life, ought to be scoured off by the oil of mirth. It is better than emery. Every man ought to rub himself with it. A man without mirth is like a wagon without springs, in which one is caused disagreeably to jolt by every pebble over which it runs.
      - [Mirth]

Mirth is the sweet wine of human life. It should be offered sparkling with zestful life unto God.
      - [Mirth]


Displaying page 8 of 18 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

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