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EDWARD GEORGE EARLE LYTTON BULWER-LYTTON, 1ST BARON LYTTON
English novelist and politician
(1803 - 1873)
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Despair makes victims sometimes victors.
      - [Despair]

Each man forms his duty according to his predominant characteristic; the stern require an avenging judge; the gentle, a forgiving father. Just so the pygmies declared that Jove himself was a pygmy.
      - [Character]

Earnest men never think in vain, though their thoughts may be errors.
      - [Thought]

Earnestness is the best gift of mental power, and deficiency of heart is the cause of many men never becoming great.
      - [Earnestness]

Emotion, whether of ridicule, anger, or sorrow,--whether raised at a puppet show, a funeral, or a battle,--is your grandest of levellers. The man who would be always superior should be always apathetic.
      - [Emotion]

Emulation, even in brutes, is sensitively "nervous." See the tremor of the thoroughbred racer before he starts. The dray-horse does not tremble, but he does not emulate. It is not his work to run a race. Says Marcus Antoninus, "It is all one to a stone whether it be thrown upward or downward." Yet the emulation of a man of genius is seldom with his contemporaries, that is, inwardly in his mind, although outwardly in his act it would seem so. The competitors with whom his secret ambition seems to vie are the dead.
      - [Emulation]

Ere yet we yearn for what is out of our reach, we are still in the cradle. When wearied out with our yearnings, desire again falls asleep; we are on the death-bed.
      - [Desire]

Evening is the delight of virtuous age; it seems an emblem of the tranquil close of busy life--serene, placid, and mild, with the impress of its great Creator stamped upon it; it spreads its quiet wings over the grave, and seems to promise that all shall be peace beyond it.
      - [Evening]

Ever since there has been so great a demand for type, there has been much less lead to spare for cannonballs.
      - [Civilization]

Every man of sound brain whom you meet known something worth knowing better than yourself. A man, on the whole, is a better preceptor than a book. But what scholar does not allow that the dullest book can suggest to him a new and a sound idea?
      - [Knowledge]

Every man who observes vigilantly and resolves steadfastly, grows unconsciously into genius.
      - [Genius]

Expression is the mystery of beauty.
      - [Beauty]

Faith builds in the dungeon and lazarhouse its sublimest shrines; and up, through roofs of stone, that shut out the eye of heaven, ascends the ladder where the angels glide to and fro,--prayer.
      - [Prayer]

Fame confers a rank above that of gentleman and of kings. As soon as she issues her patent of nobility, it matters not a straw whether the recipient be the son of a Bourbon or of a tallow-chandler.
      - [Fame]

Fate whirls on the bark, and the rough gale sweeps from the rising tide the lazy calm of thought.
      - [Fate]

Fiction may be said to be the caricature of history.
      - [Fiction]

Fine natures are like fine poems; a glance at the first two lines suffices for a guess into the beauty that waits you if you read on.
      - [Character]

Fortune is said to be blind, but her favorites never are. Ambition has the eye of the eagle, prudence that of the lynx; the first looks through the air, the last along the ground.
      - [Fortune]

Genius has no brother.
      - [Genius]

Genius in the poet, like the nomad of Arabia, ever a wanderer, still ever makes a home where the well or the palm-tree invites it to pitch the tent. Perpetually passing out of himself and his own positive circumstantial condition of being into other hearts and into other conditions, the poet obtains his knowledge of human life by transporting his own life into the lives of others.
      - [Poets]

Genius, the Pythian of the beautiful, leaves its large truths a riddle to the dull.
      - [Genius]

Give, and you may keep your friend if you lose your money; lend, and the chances are that you lose your friend if ever you get back your money.
      - [Friends]

Grief alone can teach us what is man.
      - [Grief]

Happiness and virtue react upon each other,--the best are not only the happiest, but the happiest are usually the best.
      - [Happiness]

Happy indeed the poet of whom, like Orpheus, nothing is known but an immortal name! Happy next, perhaps, the poet of whom, like Homer, nothing is known but the immortal works. The more the merely human part of the poet remains a mystery, the more willing is the reverence given to his divine mission.
      - [Fame]


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