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EDWARD GEORGE EARLE LYTTON BULWER-LYTTON, 1ST BARON LYTTON
English novelist and politician
(1803 - 1873)
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O woman! in ordinary cases so mere a mortal, how, in the great and rare events of life, dost thou swell into the angel!
      - [Women]

O woman! woman! thou shouldest have few sins of thine own to answer for! Thou art the author of such a book of follies in a man that it would need the tears of all the angels to blot the record out.
      - [Women]

O! as a bee upon the flower, I hang
  Upon the honey of thy eloquent tongue.
      - [Eloquence]

O, how much greater is the soul of one man than the vicissitudes of the whole globe! Child of heaven, and heir of immortality, how from some star hereafter wilt thou look back on the ant-hill and its commotions, from Clovis to Robespierre, from Noah to the Final Fire!
      - [Soul]

Of all the agonies in life, that which is most poignant and harrowing--that which for the time annihilates reason, and leaves our whole organization one lacerated, mangled heart--is the conviction that we have been deceived where we placed all the trust of love.
      - [Deceit]

Of all the conditions to which the heart is subject suspense is one that most gnaws and cankers into the frame. One little month of that suspense, when it involves death, we are told by an eye witness in "Wakefield on the Punishment of Death," is sufficient to plough fixed lines and furrows in a convict of five and twenty,--sufficient, to dash the brown hair with grey, and to bleach the grey to white.
      - [Suspense]

Of all the signs of a corrupt heart and a feeble head, the tendency of incredulity is the surest. Real philosophy seeks rather to solve than to deny.
      - [Incredulity]

Of all the virtues necessary to the completion of the perfect man, there is none to be more delicately implied and less ostentatiously vaunted than that of exquisite feeling or universal benevolence.
      - [Sympathy]

One of those terrible moments when the wheel of passion stands suddenly still.
      - [Remorse]

One vice worn out makes us wiser than fifty tutors.
      - [Vice]

Only by the candle, held in the skeleton hand of Poverty, can man read his own dark heart.
      - [Proverbs]

Only when the sap is dried up, only when age comes on, does the sun shine in vain for man and for the tree.
      - [Age]

Oratory, like the drama, abhors lengthiness; like the drama, it must keep doing. It avoids, as frigid, prolonged metaphysical soliloquy. Beauties themselves, if they delay or distract the effect which should be produced on the audience, become blemishes.
      - [Oratory]

Our glories float between the earth and heaven
  Like clouds which seem pavilions of the sun,
    And are the playthings of the casual wind.
      - [Glory]

Our ideas, like orange-plants, spread out in proportion to the size of the box which imprisons the roots.
      - [Ideas]

Our very wretchedness grows dear to us when suffering for one we love.
      - [Love]

Ours is a religion jealous in its demands, but how infinitely prodigal in its gifts! It troubles you for an hour, it repays you by immortality.
      - [Christianity]

Out of the ashes of misanthropy benevolence rises again; we find many virtues where we had imagined all was vice, many acts of disinterested friendship where we had fancied all was calculation and fraud--and so gradually from the two extremes we pass to the proper medium; and, feeling that no human being is wholly good or wholly base, we learn that true knowledge of mankind which induces us to expect little and forgive much. The world cures alike the optimist and the misanthrope.
      - [Misanthropy]

People who are very vain are usually equally susceptible; and they who feel one thing acutely, will so feel another.
      - [Vanity]

Personal liberty is the paramount essential to human dignity and human happiness.
      - [Freedom]

Philosophers have done wisely when they have told us to cultivate our reason rather than our feelings, for reason reconciles us to the daily things of existence; our feelings teach us to yearn after the far, the difficult, the unseen.
      - [Reason]

Philosophy, while it soothes the reason, damps the ambition.
      - [Philosophy]

Political freedom is, or ought to be, the best guaranty for the safety and continuance of spiritual, mental, and civil freedom. It is the combination of numbers to secure the liberty to each one.
      - [Politics]

Poverty is relative, and, therefor not ignoble.
      - [Poverty]

Power is so characteristically calm that calmness in itself has the aspect of power, and forbearance implies strength. The orator who is known to have at his command all the weapons of invective is most formidable when most courteous.
      - [Power]


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