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GEOFFREY CHAUCER
English poet
(c. 1340 - 1400)
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Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote
  The droghte of March hath perced to the roote.
      - The Canterbury Tales, The General Prologue
        [Books (First Lines)]

Many a smale maketh a grate.
      - The Canterbury Tales, The Parson's Tale
        [Proverbs]

The thrustelcok made eek hir lay,
  The wode dove upon the spray
    She sang ful loude and cleere.
      - The Canterbury Tales,
        The Tale of Sir Thopas [Doves]

One eare it heard, at the other out it went.
      - The Canterbury Tales (bk. IV, l. 435)
        [Hearing]

Felds hath eyen, and wode have eres.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 1,522),
        The Knight's Tale [Proverbs]

In jalousie I rede eek thou hym bynde
  And thou shalt make him couche as doeth a quaille.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 13,541),
        The Clerk's Tale [Quail]

"Now, Sire," quod she, "for aught that may bityde,
  I moste haue of the peres that I see,
    Or I moote dye, so soore longeth me
      To eten of the smalle peres grene."
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 14,669),
        The Merchant's Tale [Pears]

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 15,058),
        The Nun's Priest's Tale [Murder]

The first vertue, sone, if thou wilt lerne,
  Is to restreyne and kepen wel thy tonge.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 18,213),
        The Manciple's Tale [Tongue]

Thanne is it wysdom, as thynketh me,
  To maken vertu of necessite,
    And take it weel, that we may not eschu,
      And namely that that to us alle is due.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 2,182),
        The Knight's Tale [Necessity]

Ther seyde oones a clerk in two vers, "What is bettre than Gold? Jaspre. What is bettre than Jaspre? Wisdom. And what is bettre than Wisdom? Womman. And what is bettre than a good Womman? No thyng."
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 2,300),
        The Tale of Meliboeus [Women]

And broughte of mighty ale a large quart.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 3,497),
        The Miller's Tale [Drinking]

So was hir jolly whistel wel y-wette.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 4,155),
        The Reeve's Tale [Proverbs]

I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek.
  That hath but one hole for to sterte to.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 572),
        a paraphrase of the prologue,
        The Wife of Bath's Tale [Mice]

Ther n' is no werkman whatever he be,
  That may both werken wel and hastily.
    This wol be done at leisure parfitly.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 585),
        The Merchant's Tale [Work]

He is gentil that doth gentil dedis.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 6,695),
        The Wife of Bath's Tale [Gentleness]

Therefore it behooveth hire a full long spoon
  That shal ete with a feend.
      - The Canterbury Tales (l. 602),
        The Squire's Tale [Devil]

But every thyng which schyneth as the gold,
  Nis nat gold, as that I have herd it told.
      - The Canterbury Tales (preamble, l. 17,362),
        The Canon's Yeoman's Tale [Appearance]

And for to se, and eek for to be seye.
      - The Canterbury Tales (preamble, l. 6,134),
        The Wife of Bath's Tale [Sight]

Yet in oure asshen olde is fyr yreke.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 3,881),
        The Reeve's Tale [Fire]

And gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 308)
        [Learning]

Nowher so besy a man as he ther was,
  And yet he semed bisier than he was.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 321)
        [Work]

His studie was but litel on the Bible.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 4)
        [Scripture]

For gold in phisik is a cordial;
  Therefore he lovede gold in special.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 443)
        [Gold]

This noble ensample to his sheepe he gaf,--
  That firste he wroughte and after he taughte.
      - The Canterbury Tales (prologue, l. 496)
        [Example]


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