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CHARLES CALEB COLTON
English sportsman and writer
(1780 - 1832)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 15 of 23    Next Page >> 

Strong as our passions are, they may be starved into submission, and conquered without being killed.
      - [Passion]

Sturdy beggars can bear stout denials.
      - [Beggars]

Style is indeed the valet of genius, and an able one too; but as the true gentleman will appear, even in rags, so true genius will shine, even through the coarsest style.
      - [Style]

Subtlety will sometimes give safety, no less than strength; and minuteness has sometimes escaped, where magnitude would have been crushed. The little animal that kills the boa is formidable chiefly from its insignificance, which is incompressible by the folds of its antagonist.
      - [Subtlety]

Subtract from a great man all that be owes to opportunity and all that he owes to chance, all that he has gained by the wisdom of his friends and by the folly of his enemies, and our Brobdignag will often become a Liliputian.
      - [Greatness]

Subtract from many modern poets all that may be found in Shakespeare, and trash will remain.
      - [Authorship]

Success seems to be that which forms the distinction between confidence and conceit. Nelson, when young, was piqued at not being noticed in a certain paragraph of the newspapers, which detailed an action wherein he had assisted. "But never mind," said he, "I will one day have a gazette of my own."
      - [Conceit]

Suicide sometimes proceeds from cowardice, but not always; for cowardice sometimes prevents it, since as many live because they are afraid to die as die because they are afraid to live.
      - [Suicide]

Taking things not as they ought to be, but as they are, I fear it must be allowed that Macchiavelli will always have more disciples than Jesus.
      - [Cunning]

That alliance may be said to have a double tie, where the minds are united as well as the body; and the union will have all its strength when both the links are in perfection together.
      - [Matrimony]

That an author's work is the mirror of his mind is a position that has led to very false conclusions. If Satan himself were to write a book it would be in praise of virtue, because the good would purchase it for use, and the bad for ostentation.
      - [Authorship]

That author, however, who has thought more than he has read, read more than he has written, and written more than he has published, if he does not command success, has at least deserved it.
      - [Authorship]

That extremes beget extremes is an apothegm built on the most profound observation of the human mind.
      - [Extremes]

That is fine benevolence, finely executed, which, like the Nile, comes from hidden sources.
      - [Benevolence]

That is true beauty which has not only a substance, but a spirit; a beauty that we must intimately know, justly to appreciate.
      - [Beauty]

That policy that can strike only while the iron is hot will be overcome by that perseverance which, like Cromwell's, can make the iron hot by striking; and he that can only rule the storm must yield to him who can both raise and rule it.
      - [Opportunity]

That politeness which we put on, in order to keep the assuming and the presumptuous at a proper distance will generally succeed. But it sometimes happens that these obtrusive characters are on such excellent terms with themselves that they put down this very politeness to the score of their own great merits and high pretensions, meeting the coldness of our reserve with a ridiculous condescension of familiarity, in order to set us at ease with ourselves.
      - [Politeness]

That profound firmness which enabler a man to regard difficulties but as evils to be surmounted, no matter what shape they may assume.
      - [Firmness]

That talent confers an inequality of a much higher order than rank would appear from various views of the subject, and most particularly from this--many a man may justly thank his talent for his rank; but no man has ever yet been able to return the compliment, by thanking his rank for his talent. When Leonardo da Vinci died, his sovereign exclaimed: "I can make a thousand lords, but not one Leonardo."
      - [Talent]

That which we acquire with the most difficulty we retain the longest; as those who have earned a fortune are usually more careful of it than those who have inherited one.
      - [Acquirement]

The acquirements of science maybe termed the armor of the mind.
      - [Education]

The art of declamation has been sinking in value from the moment that speakers were foolish enough to publish, and hearers wise enough to read.
      - [Eloquence]

The avarice of the miser may be termed the grand sepulchre of all his other passions, as they successively decay. But unlike other tombs, it is enlarged by repletion and strengthened by age.
      - [Avarice]

The awkwardness and embarrassment which all feel on beginning to write, when they themselves are the theme, ought to serve as a hint to author's that self is a subject they ought very rarely to descant upon.
      - [Egotism]

The blindness of bigotry, the madness of ambition, and the miscalculations of diplomacy seek their victims principally amongst the innocent and the unoffending. The cottage is sure to suffer for every error of the court, the cabinet, or the camp. When error sits in the seat of power and of authority, and is generated in high places, it may be compared to that torrent which originates indeed in the mountain, but commits its devastation in the vale.
      - [Error]


Displaying page 15 of 23 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

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