GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


JOHN DRYDEN
English poet and dramatist
(1631 - 1700)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 19 of 21    Next Page >> 

She knows her man, and when you rant and swear,
  Can draw you to her with a single hair.
      - Persius (satire V, l. 246) [Hair]

They who write ill, and they who ne'er durst write,
  Turn critics out of mere revenge and spite.
      - Prologue to Conquest of Granada
        [Criticism]

The unhappy man, who once has trail'd a pen,
  Lives not to please himself, but other men;
    Is always drudging, wastes his life and blood,
      Yet only eats and drinks what you think good.
      - Prologue to Lee's Caesar Borgia
        [Authorship]

All who (like him) have writ ill plays before,
  For they, like thieves, condemned, are hangman made,
    To execute the members of their trade.
      - Prologue to Rival Queens [Criticism]

Thespis, the first professor of our art,
  At country wakes snug ballads from a cart.
      - Prologue to Sophonisba [Ballads]

But 'tis the talent of our English nation,
  Still to be plotting some new reformation.
      - Prologue to Sophonisba (l. 9)
        [Reformation]

Take not away the life you cannot give:
  For all things have an equal right to live.
      - Pythagorean Phil (l. 705) [Life]

And that the Scriptures, though not everywhere
  Free from corruption, or entire, or clear,
    Are uncorrupt, sufficient, clear, entire
      In all things which our needful faith require.
      - Religio Laici (l. 297) [Scripture]

The welcome news is in the letter found;
  The carrier's not commission'd to expound;
    It speaks itself, and what it does contain,
      In all things needful to be known is plain.
      - Religio Laici (l. 366) [Post]

And after hearing what our Church can say,
  If still our reason runs another way,
    That private reason 'tis more just to curb,
      Than by disputes the public peace disturb;
        For points obscure are of small use to learn,
          But common quiet is mankind's concern.
      - Religio Laici (l. 445) [Doctrine]

I have a soul that, like an ample shield,
  Can take in all, and verge enough for more.
      - Sebastian (act I, sc. 1) [Soul]

Ev'n wit's a burthen, when it talks too long.
      - Sixth Satire of Juvenal (l. 573) [Wit]

Who climbs the grammar-tree, distinctly knows
  Where noun, and verb, and participle grows.
      - Sixth Satire of Juvenal (l. 583)
        [Language]

Skill'd in the globe and sphere, he gravely stands,
  And, with his compass, measures seas and lands.
      - Sixth Satire of Juvenal (l. 760)
        [Navigation]

The poorest of the sex have still an itch
  To know their fortunes, equal to the rich.
    The dairy-maid inquires, if she shall take
      The trusty tailor, and the cook forsake.
      - Sixth Satire of Juvenal (l. 762)
        [Curiosity]

Lord of human kind.
      - Spanish Friar (act II, sc. 1) [Pride]

There is a pleasure, sure,
  In being mad, which none but madmen know!
      - Spanish Friar (act II, st. 1) [Insanity]

Happy who in his verse can gently steer
  From grave to light, from pleasant to severe.
      - The Art of Poetry (canto I, l. 75) [Poets]

Murder may pass unpunish'd for a time,
  But tardy justice will o'ertake the crime.
      - The Cock and the Fox (l. 285) [Murder]

Fame then was cheap, and the first courier sped;
  And they have kept it since, by being dead.
      - The Conquest of Granada (epilogue) [Fame]

What precious drops are those,
  Which silently each other's track pursue,
    Bright as young diamonds in their faint dew?
      - The Conquest of Grenada
         (pt. II, act III, sc. 1) [Tears]

Plain without pomp, and rich without a show.
      - The Flower and the Leaf (l. 187)
        [Character]

The fresh eglantine exhaled a breath,
  Whose odours were of power to raise from death.
      - The Flower and the Leaf (l. 96)
        [Sweetbrier Roses]

To take up half on trust, and half to try,
  Name it not faith but bungling bigotry.
      - The Hind and the Panther (pt. I, l. 141)
        [Faith]

For truth has such a face and such a mien,
  As to be lov'd needs only to be seen.
      - The Hind and the Panther (pt. I, l. 33)
        [Truth]


Displaying page 19 of 21 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 [19] 20 21

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books