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OLIVER GOLDSMITH
Irish poet, dramatist and novelist
(1728 - 1774)
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The way to acquire lasting esteem is not by the fewness of a writer's faults, but the greatness of his beauties, and our noblest works are generally most replete with both.
      - [Style]

The work of eradicating crimes is not by making punishment familiar, but formidable.
      - [Punishment]

The youth who follows his appetites too soon seizes the cup, before it has received its best ingredients, and by anticipating his pleasures, robs the remaining parts of life of their share, so that his eagerness only produces manhood of imbecility and an age of pain.
      - [Appetite]

Them that asks no questions isn't told a lie.
      - [Lying]

There are but few talents requisite to become a popular preacher; for the people are easily pleased if they perceive any endeavors in the orator to please them. The meanest qualifications will work this effect if the preacher sincerely sets about it.
      - [Preaching]

There are some faults so nearly allied to excellence that we can scarce weed out the vice without eradicating the virtue.
      - [Vice]

There is a greatness in being generous, and there is only simple justice in satisfying creditors. Generosity is the part of the soul raised above the vulgar.
      - [Generosity]

There is no arguing with Johnson; for if his pistol misses fire, he you down with the butt end of it.
      - [Argument]

There is one way by which a strolling player may be ever secure of success; that is, in our theatrical way of expressing it, to make a great deal of the character. To speak and act as in common life is not playing, nor is it what people come to see; natural speaking, like sweet wine, runs glibly over the palate and scarcely leaves any taste behind it; but being high in a part resembles vinegar, which grates upon the taste, and one feels it while he is drinking.
      - [Acting]

There is probably no country so barbarous that would not disclose all it knew, if it received equivalent information; and I am apt to think that a person who was ready to give more knowledge than he received would be welcome wherever he came.
      - [Travel]

There is unspeakable pleasure attending the life of a voluntary student.
      - [Students]

There is yet a silent agony in which the mind appears to disdain all external help, and broods over its distresses with gloomy reserve. This is the most dangerous state of mind; accidents or friendships may lessen the louder kinds of grief, but all remedies for this must be had from within, and there despair too often finds the most deadly enemy.
      - [Grief]

These people, however fallen, are still men, and that is a very good title to my affection.
      - [Titles]

This is that eloquence the ancients represented as lightning, bearing down every opposer; this the power which has turned whole assemblies into astonishment, admiration and awe--that is described by the torrent, the flame, and every other instance of irresistible impetuosity.
      - [Eloquence]

Those who place their affections at first on trifles for amusement, will find these trifles become at last their most serious concerns.
      - [Trifles]

Thus love is the most easy and agreeable, and gratitude the most humiliating, affection of the mind. We never reflect on the man we love without exulting in our choice, while he who has bound us to him by benefits alone rises to our ideas as a person to whom we have in some measure forfeited our freedom.
      - [Gratitude]

Titles and mottoes to books are like escutcheons and dignities in the hands of a king. The wise sometimes condescend to accept of them; but none but a fool would imagine them of any real importance. We ought to depend upon intrinsic merit, and not the slender helps of the title.
      - [Titles]

To be poor, and to seem poor, is a certain method never to rise.
      - [Poverty]

To make a fine, gentleman, several trades are required, but chiefly a barber.
      - [Gentlemen]

True generosity is a duty as indispensably necessary as those imposed upon us by the law. It is a rule imposed upon us by reason, which should be the sovereign law of a rational being.
      - [Generosity]

Villainy, when detected, never gives up, but boldly adds impudence to imposture.
      - [Villainy]

We are all sure of two things, at least; we shall suffer and we shall all die.
      - [Destiny]

Wept o'er his wounds, or tales of sorrow done,
  Shoulder'd his crutch, and show'd how fields were won.
      - [Proverbs]

Were I to be angry at men being fools, I could here find ample room for declamation; but, alas! I have been a fool myself; and why should I be angry with them for being something so natural to every child of humanity?
      - [Fools]

What real good does an addition to a fortune already sufficient procure? Not any. Could the great man, by having his fortune increased, increase also his appetites, then precedence might be attended with real amusement.
      - [Fortune]


Displaying page 6 of 13 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

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