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OLIVER GOLDSMITH
Irish poet, dramatist and novelist
(1728 - 1774)
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Every pang that rends the heart.
      - The Captivity [Christ]

Aromatic plants bestow
  No spicy fragrance while they grow;
    But crush'd or trodden to the ground,
      Diffuse their balmy sweets around.
      - The Captivity (act I) [Adversity]

Hope, like the gleaming taper's light,
  Adorns and cheers our way;
    And still, as darker grows the night,
      Emits a brighter ray.
      - The Captivity (act II, sc. 1) [Hope]

The wretch condemn'd with life to part,
  Still, still on hope relies;
    And every pang that rends the heart
      Bids expectation rise.
      - The Captivity--Song [Hope]

"The Republic of Letters" is a very common expression among the Europeans.
      - The Citizen of the World (20) [Authorship]

Books are necessary to correct the vices of the polite; but those vices are ever changing, and the antidote should be changed accordingly--should still be new.
      - The Citizen of the World (letter LXXII)
        [Books]

In proportion as society refines, new books must ever become more necessary.
      - The Citizen of the World (letter LXXII)
        [Books]

In a polite age almost every person becomes a reader, and receives more instruction from the Press than the Pulpit.
      - The Citizen of the World (letter LXXV)
        [Reading]

The first time I read an excellent book, it is to me just as if I had gained a new friend. When I read a book over I have perused before, it resembles the meeting with an old one.
      - The Citizen of the World (letter LXXXIII)
        [Reading]

By every remove I only drag a greater length of chain.
      - The Citizen of the World (no. 3) [Memory]

John Trott was desired by two witty peers
  To tell them the reason why asses had ears.
    "An't please you," quoth John, "I'm not given to letters;
      Nor dare I pretend to know more than my betters:
        Howe'er, from this time I shall ne'er see your graces,
          As I hope to be saved! without thinking on asses."
      - The Clown's Reply [Asses]

Trade's proud empire hastes to swift decay.
      - The Deserted Village,
        lines actually added to Goldsmith's work by Samuel Johnson
        [Business]

All the bloomy flush of life is fled.
      - The Deserted Village (128) [Life]

Bends to the grave with unperceived decay,
  While resignation gently slopes the way
    And, all his prospects brightening to the last,
      His heaven commences ere the world be past.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 110)
        [Resignation]

While resignation gently slopes the way;
  And, all his prospects brightening to the last,
    His heaven commences ere the world be past.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 110) [Heaven]

The watch-dog's voice that bay'd the whispering wind,
  And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind:
    There all in sweet confusion sought the shade,
      And fill'd each pause the nightingale had made.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 121) [Night]

The hawthorn-brush, with seats beneath the shade
  For talking age and whispering lovers made!
      - The Deserted Village (l. 13) [Hawthorn]

His house was known to all the vagrant train,
  He chid their wanderings but reliev'd their pain;
    The long remembered beggar was his guest,
      Whose beard descending swept his aged breast.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 149)
        [Philanthropy]

The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay;
  Sat by his fire, and talked the night away,
    Wept o'er his wounds, or tales of sorrow done,
      Shoulder'd his crutch, and show'd how fields were won.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 155) [Soldiers]

Careless their merits or their faults to scan,
  His pity gave ere charity began.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 161)
        [Philanthropy]

Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride,
  And e'en his failings lean'd to virtue's side.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 163) [Virtue]

But in his duty prompt at every call,
  He watch'd and wept, he pray'd and felt for all.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 165) [Preaching]

He watch'd and wept, he pray'd and felt for all.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 166) [Sympathy]

Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 170) [Example]

At church, with meek and unaffected grace,
  His looks adorn'd the venerable place;
    Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway,
      And fools, who came to scoff, remain'd to pray.
      - The Deserted Village (l. 177) [Prayer]


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