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FRANCOIS DUC DE LA ROCHEFOUCAULD
French philanthropist and social reformer
(1613 - 1680)
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Man speak but little when vanity does not induce them to speak.
      - [Vanity]

Man's chief wisdom consists in being sensible of his follies.
      - [Wisdom]

Many young persons believe themselves natural when they are only impolite and coarse.
      - [Manners]

Men are not only prone to forget benefits; they even hate those who have obliged them, and cease to hate those who have injured them. The necessity of revenging an injury, or of recompensing a benefit seems a slavery to which they are unwilling to submit.
      - [Benevolence]

Men are oftener treacherous through weakness than design.
      - [Treachery]

Men give away nothing so liberally as their advice.
      - [Advice]

Men more easily renounce their interests than their tastes.
      - [Taste]

Men would not live long in society, were they not the mutual dupes of each other.
      - [Disguise]

Minds of moderate calibre ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond their range.
      - [Mind]

Misers mistake gold for their good; whereas it is only the means of obtaining it.
      - [Misers]

Moderation cannot have the credit of combatiug and subduing ambition, they are never found together. Moderation is the languor and indolence of the soul, as ambition is its activity and ardor.
      - [Ambition]

Moderation resembles temperance. We are not so unwilling to eat more, as afraid of doing ourselves harm by it.
      - [Moderation]

More men are guilty of treason through weakness than any studied design to betray.
      - [Weakness]

Most frequently we make confidants from vanity, a love of talking, a wish to win the confidence of others, and to make an exchange of secrets.
      - [Confidence]

Narrowness of mind is often the cause of obstinacy; we do not easily believe beyond what we see.
      - [Obstinacy]

Nature makes merit, and fortune puts it to work.
      - [Merit]

No disguise can long conceal love where it is, nor feign it where it is not.
      - [Love]

No man can answer for his own valor or courage till he has been in danger.
      - [Valor]

None but the contemptible are apprehensive of contempt.
      - [Contempt]

Nothing is impossible; there are ways which lead to everything; and if we had sufficient will we should always have sufficient means.
      - [Impossibility]

Nothing is so capable of diminishing self-love as the observation that we disapprove at one time what we approve at another.
      - [Self-love]

Nothing is so contagious as example; never was there any considerable good or ill done that does not produce its like. We imitate good actions through emulation, and had ones through a malignity in our nature, which shame conceals, and example sets at liberty.
      - [Example]

Nothing rarer than real goodness.
      - [Goodness]

Nothing so much prevents our being natural as the desire of appearing so.
      - [Manners]

Novelty is to love like bloom to fruit; it gives a luster which is easily effaced, but never returns.
      - [Flirting]


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