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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 65 of 186    Next Page >> 

You gave with them words of so sweet breath composed, as made the things more rich.
      - [Gifts]

You have lost no reputation at all, unless you repute yourself such a loser.
      - [Reputation]

You have too much respect upon the world:
  They lose it that do buy it with much care.
      - [World]

You know
  That I do fawn on men, and hug them hard,
    And after scandal them.
      - [Scandal]

You know that love
  Will creep in service where it cannot go.
      - [Service]

You may as well
  Forbid the sea for to obey the moon,
    As, or by oath, remove, or counsel, shake
      The fabric of his folly, whose foundation
        Is pil'd upon his faith.
      - [Obstinacy]

You may my glories and my state depose,
  But not my griefs; still am I king of those.
      - [Grief]

You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar.
      - [Soldiers]

You may ride us with one soft kiss a thousand furlongs, ere with spur we heat an acre.
      - [Kindness]

You must confine yourself within the modest limits of order.
      - [Order]

You nimble lightnings, dart your blinding flames
  Into her scornful eyes!--Infect her beauty,
    You fen-suck'd fogs, drawn by the powerful sun,
      To fall and blister her pride!
      - [Curses]

You say, you are a better soldier:
  Let it appear so; make your vaunting true.
    And it shall please me well.
      - [Soldiers]

You see me here,--a poor old man,
  As full of grief as age; wretched in both!
      - [Age]

You shall never take her without her answer, unless you take her without her tongue.
      - [Loquacity]

Your affections are
  A sick man's appetite, who desires most that
    Which would increase his evil. He that depends
      Upon your favor, swims with fins of lead,
        And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye! Trust ye?
          With every minute you do change a mind;
            And call him noble that was now your hate,
              Him vile that was your garland.
      - [Popularity]

Your children were vexation to your youth.
      - [Vexation]

Your date is better in your pie and your porridge than in your cheek.
      - [Age]

Your fair discourse hath been as sugar,
  Making the hard way sweet and delectable.
      - [Speech]

Your gentleness shall force, more than your force move us to gentleness.
      - [Gentleness]

Your play needs no excuse.
      - [Golf]

Your worm is your only emperor for diet; we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots.
      - [Diet]

So on the tip of his subduing tongue
  All kinds of arguments and question deep,
    All replication prompt and reason strong,
      For his advantage still did wake and sleep.
        To make the weeper laugh, the laugher weep,
          He had the dialect and different skill,
            Catching all passions in his craft of will; . . .
      - A Lover's Complaint (l. 120) [Tongue]

A golden mind stoops not to shows of dross;
  I'll then nor give not hazard aught for lead.
      - A Merchant of Venice (Morocco at II, vii)
        [Vanity]

Ay me! for aught that I could ever read,
  Could ever hear by tale or history,
    The course of true love never did run smooth;
      But either it was different in blood--
        . . . .
          Or else misgraffed in respect of years--
            . . . .
              Or else it stood upon the choice of friends--
                . . . .
                  Or, if there were a sympathy in choice,
                    War, death, or sickness did lay siege to it,
                      Making it momentany as a sound,
                        Swift as a shadow, short as any dream
                          Brief as the lightning in the collied night,
                            That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
                              And ere a man hath power to say 'Behold!'
                                The jaws of darkness do devour it up:
                                  So quick bright things come to confusion.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream
         (Lysander at I, i) [Love]

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
  And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
      - A Midsummer Night's Dream (Helena at I, i)
        [Love]


Displaying page 65 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 [65] 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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