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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 104 of 186    Next Page >> 

Decrepit miser! base ignoble wretch!
  I am descended of a gentler blood.
    Thou art no father nor friend of mine.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part I
         (Pucelle at V, iv) [Misers]

Thus Suffolk hath prevailed; and thus he goes,
  As did the youthful Paris once to Greece,
    With hope to find the like event of love
      But prosper better than the Trojan did.
        Margaret shall now be queen, and rule the king;
          But I will rule both her, the king, and realm.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part I
         (Suffolk at V, v) [Books (Last Lines)]

As by your high imperial majesty
  I had in charge at my depart for France,
    As procurator to your excellence,
      To marry Princess Margaret for your grace,
        So, in the famous ancient city Tours,
          In presence of the Kings of France and Sicil,
            The Dukes of Orleans, Calabar, Bretagne, and Alencon,
              Seven earls, twelve barons, and twenty reverend bishops,
                I have performed my mask and was espoused; . . . .
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at I, i) [Books (First Lines)]

Did he so often lodge in open field,
  In winter's cold and summer's parching heat,
    To conquer France, his true inheritance?
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at I, i) [Summer]

For thou hast given me in this beauteous face
  A world of earthly blessings to my soul,
    If sympathy of love unite our thoughts.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at I, i) [Sympathy]

Nephew, what means this passionate discourse,
  This peroration with such circumstance?
    For France, 'tis ours; and we will keep it still.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Cardinal Beaufort at I, i) [Oratory]

Proud prelate, in thy face
  I see thy fury. If I longer stay,
    We shall begin our ancient bickerings.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at I, i) [Face]

Then will I raise aloft the milk-white rose,
  With whose sweet smell the air shall be perfumed,
    And in my standard bear the arms of York
      To grapple with the house of Lancaster;
        And force perforce I'll make him yield the crown
          Whose bookishrule hath pulled fair England down.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Plantagenet, Duke of York at I, i)
        [Roses]

And wilt thou still be hammering treachery
  To tumble down thy husband and thyself
    From top of honor to disgrace's feet?
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at I, ii) [Disgrace]

I tell thee, Pole, when in the city Tours
  Thou ran'st a-tilt in honor of my love
    And stol'st away the ladies' hearts of France,
      I thought King Henry had resembled thee
        In courage, courtship, and proportion;
          But all his mind is bent to holiness,
            To number Ave-Maries on his beads;
              His champions are the prophets and apostles,
                His weapons holy saws of sacred writ;
                  His study is his tiltyard, and his loves
                    Are brazen images of canonized saints.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Margaret, Queen to King Henry at I, iii)
        [Holiness : Prayer]

She bears a duke's revenues on her back,
  And in her heart she scorns our poverty.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Margaret, Queen to King Henry at I, iii)
        [Pride]

(Gloucester:) Were it not good your grace could fly to heaven?
  (King Henry:) The treasury of everlasting joy.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester & King Henry at II, i)
        [Heaven]

How irksome is this music to my heart!
  When such strings jar, what hope of harmony?
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at II, i) [Music]

Let never day nor night unhallowed pass
  But still remember what the Lord hath done.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at II, i) [Thankfulness]

My lord, 'tis but a base ignoble mind
  That mounts no higher than a bird can soar.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at II, i) [Mind]

No marvel, an it like your majesty,
  My Lord Protector's hawks do tower so well;
    They know their master loves to be aloft
      And bears his thoughts above his falcon's pitch.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at II, i) [Hawks]

Henry will to himself
  Protector be; and God shall be my hope,
    My stay, my guide, and lantern to my feet.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at II, iii) [God]

A heart unspotted is not easily daunted.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at III, i) [Proverbs]

A staff is quickly found to beat a dog.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Gloucester at III, i) [Opportunity]

And as the butcher takes away the calf
  And binds the wretch and beats it when it strains,
    Bearing it to the bloody slaughterhouse,
      Even so remorseless have they borne him hence;
        And as the dam runs lowing up and down,
          Looking the way her harmless young one went,
            And can do naught but wail her darling's loss,
              Even so myself bewails good Gloucester's case
                With said unhelpful tears, and with dimmed eyes
                  Look after him and cannot do him good,
                    So mighty are his vowed enemies.
                      His fortunes I will weep, and 'twixt each groan
                        Say 'Who's a traitor? Gloucester he is none.'
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (King Henry at III, i) [Tears]

And wer't not madness then
  To make the fox surveyor of the fold.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at III, i) [Proverbs]

Now 'tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted.
  Suffer them now, and they'll o'ergrow the garden
    And choke the herbs for want of husbandry.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Queen Margaret at III, i) [Weeds]

Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep,
  And in his simple show he harbors treason.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at III, i)
        [Proverbs : Silence : Treason]

Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at III, i) [Proverbs : Silence]

The fox barks not when he would steal the lamb.
      - King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Suffolk at III, i) [Proverbs]


Displaying page 104 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 [104] 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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