GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 129 of 186    Next Page >> 

We cannot all be masters, nor all masters
  Cannot be truly followed.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice (Iago at I, i)
        [Service]

Whip me such honest knaves!
      - Othello the Moor of Venice (Iago at I, i)
        [Knavery]

Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, ii) [Maintenance]

Mine's not an idle cause.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Brabantio at I, ii) [Cause]

Her father loved me, oft invited me;
  Still questioned me the story of my life
    From year to year--the battles, sieges, fortunes
      That I have passed.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Life]

It is silliness to live when to live is torment; and then have we a prescription to die when death is our physician.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Roderigo at I, iii) [Life]

My life upon her faith!
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Trust]

My noble father,
  I do perceive here a divided duty.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Desdemona at I, iii) [Duty]

Neither my place, nor aught I heard of business,
  Hath raised me from my bed; nor doth the general care
    Take hold on me; for my particular grief
      Is of so floodgate and o'erbearing nature
        That it engluts and swallows other sorrows,
          And it is still itself.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Brabantio at I, iii) [Grief]

No, when light-winged toys
  Of feathered Cupid seel with wanton dullness
    My speculative and officed instruments,
      That my disports and taint my business,
        Let housewives make a skillet of my helm,
          And all indign and base adversities
            Make head against my estimation!
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Cookery]

O villainous! I have looked upon the world for four times seven years; and since I could distinguish betwixt a benefit and an injury, I never found man that knew how to love himself.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Iago at I, iii) [Self-love]

Of moving accidents by flood and field.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Accident]

Rude am I in my speech,
  And little blessed with the soft phrase of peace;
    For since these arms of mine had seven years' pith
      Till now some nine moons wasted, they have used
        Their dearest action in the tented field;
          And little of this great world can I speak
            More than pertains to feats of broil and battle;
              And therefore little shall I grace my cause
                In speaking for myself.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Speech]

She has deceived her father, and may thee.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Brabantio at I, iii) [Proverbs]

She loved me for the dangers I had passed,
  And I loved her for having pitied them.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Proverbs]

She swore, i' faith, 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange;
  'Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Wonder]

She wished she had not heard it; yet she wished
  That heaven had made her such a man. She thanked me;
    And bade me, if I had a friend that loved her,
      I should but teach him how to tell my story,
        And that would woo her.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Wooing]

The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief,
  He robs himself that spends a bootless grief.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Duke of Venice at I, iii) [Thieving]

The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
  Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war
    My thrice-driven bed of down.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Custom]

There sentences, to sugar, or to gall,
  Being strong on both sides, are equivocal.
    But words are words. I never yet did hear
      That the bruised heart was pierced through the ear.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Brabantio at I, iii) [Words]

To mourn a mischief that is past and gone
  Is the next way to draw new mischief on.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Duke of Venice at I, iii) [Mischief]

Upon this hint I spake.
  She loved me for the dangers I had passed,
    And I loved her that she did pity them.
      This only is the witchcraft I have used.
        Here comes the lady. Let her witness it.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Danger : Love]

When remedies are past, the griefs are ended
  By seeing the worst, which late on hopes depended.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Duke of Venice at I, iii) [Grief]

Wherein I spoke of most disastrous chances,
  Of moving accidents by flood and field;
    Of hairbreadth scapes i' th' imminent deadly breach;
      Of being taken by the insolent foe
        And sold to slavery; of my redemption thence
          And portance in my travels' history;
            Wherein of anters vast and deserts idle,
              Rough quarries, rocks, and hill whose heads touch heaven,
                It was my hint to speak--such was the process;
                  And of the Cannibals that each other eat,
                    The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads
                      Do grow beneath their shoulders.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Othello at I, iii) [Traveling]

Whoe'er he be that in this foul proceeding
  Hath thus beguiled your daughter of herself,
    And you of her, the bloody book of law
      You shall yourself read in the bitter letter
        After your own sense; yea, though our proper son
          Stood in your action.
      - Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Duke of Venice at I, iii) [Law]


Displaying page 129 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 [129] 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books
Buy book by
William Shakespeare
from
Varying Hare Books