GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 138 of 186    Next Page >> 

Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.
      - Romeo and Juliet
         (Escalus, Prince of Verona at III, i)
        [Mercy]

No, 'tis not so deep as a well. nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Mercutio at III, i)
        [Contentment]

O, here come my nurse,
  And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks
    But Romeo's name speaks heavenly eloquence.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, i)
        [Eloquence]

Thou! why, thou wilt quarrel with a man that hath a hair more or a hair less in his beard than thou hast. Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes. What eye but such an eye would spy out such a quarrel? Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat; and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarreling. Thou hast quarrelled with a man for coughing in the street, because he hath wakened thy dog that hath lain asleep in in the sun. Didst thou fall out with a tailor for wearing his new doublet before Easter? with another for tying his new shoes with old riband? And yet thou wilt tutor me from quarreling!
      - Romeo and Juliet (Mercutio at III, i)
        [Quarreling]

Come, gentle night; come, loving, black-browed night;
  Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die,
    Take him and cut him out in little stars,
      And he will make the face of heaven so fine
        That all the world will be in love with night
          And pay no worship to the garish sun.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Love : Night]

Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night;
  For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night
    Whiter than new snow upon a raven's back.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Purity : Snow]

He was not born to shame.
  Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit;
    For 'tis a throne where honor may be crowned
      Sole monarch of the universal earth.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Shame]

O serpent heart, hid with a flow'ring face!
  Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Hypocrisy]

O, break, my heart! poor bankrout, break at once!
  To prison, eyes; ne'er look on liberty!
    Vile earth, to earth resign; end motion here,
      And thou and Romeo press one heavy bier!
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Despair]

O, that deceit should dwell
  In such a gorgeous palace!
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Deceit]

So tedious is this day
  As is the night before some festival
    To an impatient child that hath new robes
      And may not wear them.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Apparel]

When he shall die
  Take him and cut him in little stars
    And he will make the face of heaven so fine
      That all the world will be in love with night
        And pay no worship to the garish sun.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, ii)
        [Death]

Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.
      - Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at III, iii)
        [Adversity : Proverbs]

Affliction is enamoured of thy parts,
  And thou art wedded to calamity.
      - Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at III, iii) [Affliction]

Hadst thou no poison mixed, no sharp-ground knife,
  No sudden mean of death, though ne'er so mean,
    But 'banished' to kill me--'banished'?
      O friar, the damned use that word in hell;
        Howling attends it! How hast thou the heart,
          Being a divine, a ghostly confessor,
            A sin-absolver, and my friend professed,
              To mangle me with that word 'banished'?
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, iii)
        [Banishment]

I'll give thee armor to keep off that word;
  Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy,
    To comfort thee, though thou art banished.
      - Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at III, iii) [Philosophy]

They may seize
  On the white wonder of dear Juliet's hand
    And steal immortal blessing from her lips,
      Who, even in pure and vestal modesty,
        Still blush, as thinking their own kisses sin;
          But Romeo may not, he is banished.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, iii)
        [Hand : Kisses]

Thou canst not speak of that thou does not feel.
  Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,
    An hour but married, Tybalt murdered,
      Doting like me, and like me banished,
        Them mightst thou speak, then mightst thou tear thy hair,
          And fall upon the ground, as I do now,
            Taking the measure of an unmade grave.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, iii)
        [Graves]

I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve
  For sweet discourses in our times to come.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, v) [Woe]

I have more care to stay than will to go.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, v) [Want]

Is there no pity sitting in the clouds
  That sees into the bottom of my grief?
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, v) [Pity]

It is the lark that sings so out of tune,
  Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, v)
        [Larks]

It was the lark, the herald of the morn;
  No nightingale.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, v) [Larks]

Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
  Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain-tops.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at III, v)
        [Morning : Proverbs]

O Fortune, Fortune! all men call thee fickle.
  If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him
    That is renowned for faith? Be fickle, Fortune,
      For then I hope thou wilt not keep him long
        But send him back.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, v)
        [Fortune]


Displaying page 138 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 [138] 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books
Buy book by
William Shakespeare
from
Varying Hare Books