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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 139 of 186    Next Page >> 

Some grief shows much of love;
  But much of grief shows still some want of wit.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Lady Capulet at III, v)
        [Grief]

Villain and he be many miles asunder.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, v)
        [Villainy]

Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day.
  It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
    That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.
      Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.
        Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III, v)
        [Nightingales]

O, here comes my nurse,
  And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks
    But Romeo's name speaks heavenly eloquence.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at III,ii)
        [Eloquence]

The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade
  To paly ashes.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Friar Laurence at IV, i)
        [Proverbs]

I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell
  And gave him what becomed love I might,
    Not stepping o'er the bounds of modesty.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at IV, ii)
        [Modesty]

Marry, sir, 'tis an ill cook that cannt lick his own fingers. Therefore he that cannot lick his fingers goes not with me.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Servingman at IV, ii)
        [Cookery]

Sirrah, go hire me twenty cunning cooks.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Capulet at IV, ii)
        [Cookery]

Take thou this vial, being then in bed,
  And this distilling liquor drink thou off;
    When presently through all thy veins shall run
      A cold and drowsy humor; for no pulse
        Shall keep his native progress, but surcease;
          No warmth, no breath, shall testify thou livest;
            The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade
              To wanny ashes, thy eyes' windows fall
                Like death when he shuts up the day of life;
                  Each part, deprived of supple government,
                    Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death;
                      And in this borrowed likeness of shrunk death
                        Thou shalt continue two-and-forty hours,
                          And then awake as from a pleasant sleep.
      - Romeo and Juliet
         (Friar Laurence at IV, ii) [Sleep]

I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins
  That almost freezes up the heat of life.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Juliet at IV, iii)
        [Fear]

All things that we ordained festival
  Turn from their office to black funeral--
    Our instruments to melancholy bells,
      Our wedding cheer to a sad burial feast;
        Our solemn hymns to sullen dirges change;
          Our bridal flowers serve for a buried corse;
            And all things change them to the contrary.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Capulet at IV, v)
        [Change]

Confusion's cure lives not
  In these confusions.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Friar Laurence at IV, v)
        [Proverbs]

Out alas! she's cold,
  Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff;
    Life and these lips have long been separated.
      Death lies on her like an untimely frost
        Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Capulet at IV, v)
        [Death]

She's not well married that lived married long,
  But she's best married that dies married young.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Friar Laurence at IV, v)
        [Matrimony]

A beggary account of empty boxes. . . .
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Acting]

Being holiday, the beggar's shop is shut.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i)
        [Holidays]

Famine is in thy cheeks,
  Need and oppression starveth in thy eyes,
    Contempt and beggary hangs upon thy back:
      The world is not thy friend, not the world's law;
        The world affords no law to make thee rich;
          Then be not poor, but break it and take this.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Poverty]

Her body sleeps in Capel's monument,
  And her immortal part with angels lives.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Man at V, i)
        [Immortality]

Hold, there is forty ducats. Let me have
  A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear
    As will disperse itself through all the veins
      That the life-weary taker may fall dead,
        And that the trunk may be discharged of breath
          As violently as hasty powder fired
            Doth hurry from the fatal cannon's womb.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Poison]

I do remember an apothecary,
  And hereabouts 'a dwells, which late I noted
    In tatt'red weeds, with overwhelming brows,
      Culling of simples. Meagre were his looks,
        Sharp misery had worn him to the bones;
          And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
            An alligator stuffed, and other skins
              Of ill-shaped fishes; and about his shelves
                A beggarly account of empty boxes,
                  Green earthen pots, bladders, and musty seeds,
                    Remnants of packthread, and old cakes of roses
                      Were thinly scattered, to make up a show.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i)
        [Medicine]

If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,
  My dreams presage some joyful news at hand.
    My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne,
      And all this day an unaccustomed spirit
        Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Dreams]

Meagre were his looks,
  Sharp misery had worn him to the bones;
    And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
      An alligator stuffed, and other skins
        Of ill-shaped fishes; and about his shelves
          A beggarly account of boxes,
            Green earthen pots, bladders, and musty seeds,
              Remnants of packthread, and old cakes of roses
                Were thinly scattered, to make up a show.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Misery]

My poverty, but not my will consents.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Apothecary at V, i)
        [Proverbs]

O mischief, thou art swift
  To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i)
        [Mischief]

There is thy gold--worse poison to men's souls,
  Doing more murder in this loathsome world,
    Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
      I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none
        Farewell. Buy food and get thyself in flesh.
      - Romeo and Juliet (Romeo at V, i) [Bribery]


Displaying page 139 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 [139] 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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