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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 145 of 186    Next Page >> 

How my achievements mock me!
  I will go meet them.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at IV, ii) [Action]

O Cressida, but that the busy day,
  Waked by the lark, hath roused the ribald crows,
    And dreaming night will hide our joys no longer,
      I would not from thee.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at IV, ii) [Morning]

But something may be done that we will not;
  And sometimes we are devils to ourselves
    When we will tempt the frailty of our powers,
      Presuming on their changeful potency.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at IV, iv) [Frailty : Temptation]

(Pandarus:) Be moderate, be moderate.
  (Cressida:) Why tell you me of moderation?
    The grief is fine, full, perfect, that I taste,
      And violenteth in a sense as strong
        As that which causeth it. How can I moderate it?
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Pandarus & Cressida at IV, iv)
        [Moderation]

Every man is odd.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Menelaus at IV, v) [Man]

Fie, fie upon her!
  There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip;
    Nay, her foot speaks. Her wanton spirits look out
      At every joint and motive of her body.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at IV, v) [Language]

I had good argument for kissing once.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Menelaus at IV, v) [Kisses]

I'll take that winter from your lips, fair lady.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Achilles at IV, v) [Kisses]

My prophecy is but half his journey yet,
  For yonder walls, that pertly front your town,
    Yon towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds,
      Must kiss their own feet.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at IV, v) [Clouds]

The end crowns all,
  And that old common arbitrator, Time,
    Will one day end it.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Hector at IV, v) [End : Proverbs : Time]

There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip;
  Nay, her foot speaks.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at IV, v) [Feet]

Worthy all arms, as welcome as to one
  That would be rid of such an enemy--
    [But that's no welcome. Understand more clear,
      What's past and what's to come is strew'd with husks
        And formless ruin of oblivion;
          But in this extant moment, faith and troth,
            Strained purely from all hollow bias drawing,
              Bids thee, with most divine integrity,]
                From heart of very heart, great Hector, welcome.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Agamemnon at IV, v) [Oblivion]

In Troy there likes the scene. From isles of Greece
  The princes orgulous, their high blood chafed,
    Have to the port of Athens sent their ships,
      Fraught with the ministers and instruments
        Of cruel war.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Speaker at prologue)
        [Books (First Lines)]

Here's Agamemnon, an honest fellow enough, and one that loves quails, but he has not so much brain as ear-wax; and the goodly transformation of Jupiter there, his brother, the bull, the primitive statue and oblique memorial of cockolds; a thrifty shoeing-horn in a chain, hanging at his brother's leg, to what form but that he is should wit larded with malice and malice forced with wit turn him to? To an ass, were nothing; he is both ass and ox: to an ox, were nothing; he is both ox and ass. To be a dog, a mule, a cat, a fitchew, a toad, a lizard, an owl, a puttock, or a herring without roe, I would not care; but to be Memelaus! I would conspire against destiny.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Thersites at V, i) [Quail]

Ah, poor our sex! this fault in us I find,
  The error of our eye directs our mind.
    What error leads must error.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cressida at V, ii) [Error]

Go in and cheer the town. We'll forth and fight;
  Do deeds worth praise and tell you them at night.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Hector at V, iii) [Deeds]

The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows.
  They are polluted off'rings, more abhorred!
    Than spotted livers in the sacrifice.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Cassandra at V, iii) [Abhorrence]

Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart;
  Th' effect doth operate another way.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Troilus at V, iii) [Words]

Here, here, and everywhere, he leaves and takes,
  Dexterity so obeying appetite
    That what he will he does, and does so much
      That proof is called impossibility.
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Nestor at V, v) [Will]

It should be now, but that my fear is this,
  Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss.
    Till then I'll sweat and seek about for eases,
      And at that time bequeath you my diseases.'
      - The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Pandarus at V, x) [Books (Last Lines)]

Well, whiles I am a beggar I will rail
  And say, there is no sin but to be rich;
    And being rich, my virtue then shall be
      To say, there is no vice but beggary.
      - The Life and Death of King John [Beggars]

'Good den, Sir Richard!'--'God-a-mercy, fellow'--
  And if his name be George, I'll call him Peter,
    For new-made honor doth forget men's names;
      'Tis too respective and too sociable
        For your conversion.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at I, i) [Names]

Now, say, Chatillion, what would France with us?
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at I, i) [Books (First Lines)]

Some sins do bear their privilege on earth,
  And so doth yours; your fault was not your folly.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at I, i) [Sin]

. . . As she in beauty, education, blood,
  Holds hand with any princess of the world.
      - The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at II, i) [Equality]


Displaying page 145 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 [145] 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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