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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 166 of 186    Next Page >> 

Say that she frown, I'll say she looks as clear
  As morning roses newly washed with dew.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at II, i) [Beauty]

Say that she rail, why then I'll tell her plain
  She sings as sweetly as a nightingale.
    Say that she frown, I'll say she looks as clear
      As morning roses newly washed with dew.
        Say she be mute and will not speak a word,
          Then I'll commend her volubility
            And say she uttereth piercing eloquence.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at II, i) [Women]

Though little fire grows great with little wind,
  Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at II, i) [Proverbs]

Why, that is nothing, for I tell you, father,
  I am as peremptory as she proud-minded,
    And where two waging fires meet together
      They do consume the thing that feeds their fury.
        Though little fire grows great with little wind,
          Yet extreme gusts will blow out fire and all.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at II, i) [Extremes]

Will you not suffer me? Nay, now I see
  She is your treasure, she must have a husband;
    I must dance barefoot on her wedding-day,
      And for your love to her lead apes in hell.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Kate at II, i)
        [Matrimony]

Old fashions please me best; I am not so nice
  To change true rules for odd inventions.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Bianca at III, i)
        [Change]

Preposterous ass, that never read so far
  To know the cause why music was ordained!
    Was it not to refresh the mind of man
      After his studies or his usual pain?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lucentio at III, i) [Music]

I must, forsooth, be forced
  To give my hand opposed against my heart
    Unto a mad-brain rudesby, full of spleen,
      Who wooed in haste and means to wed at leisure.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Kate at III, ii)
        [Matrimony]

Master, master, old news! And such news as you never heard of!
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Biondello at III, ii) [News]

Nay, look not big, nor stamp, nor stare, nor fret;
  I will be master of what is mine own.
    She is my goods, my chattels; she is my house,
      My household stuff, my field, my barn,
        My horse, my ox, my ass, my anything;
          And here she stands, touch her whoever dare.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at III, ii) [Wives]

This done, he took his bride about the neck
  And kissed her lips with such a clamorous smack
    That at the parting all the church did echo.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Gremio at III, ii) [Kisses]

And if the boy have not a woman's gift
  To rain a shower of commanded tears,
    An onion will do well for such a shift,
      Which in a napkin being close conveyed
        Shall in despite enforce a watery eye.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lord at induction, i) [Tears]

What think you, if he were conveyed to bed,
  Wrapped in sweet clothes, rings put upon his fingers,
    A most delicious banquet by his bed,
      And brave attendants near him when he wakes,
        Would not the beggar then forget himself?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lord at induction, i) [Luxury]

Dost thou love hawking? Thou hast hawks will soar
  Above the morning lark.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lord at induction, ii) [Hawks]

Therefore they thought it good for hear a play
  And frame your mind to mirth and merriment,
    Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Messenger at induction, ii) [Merriment]

Wilt thou have music? Hark, Apollo plays,
  And twenty caged nightingales do sing.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Lord at induction, ii) [Music]

Your honor's players, hearing your amendment,
  Are come to play a pleasant comedy,
    For so your doctors hold it very meet,
      Seeing too much sadness hath congealed your blood
        And melancholy is the nurse of frenzy.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Messenger at induction, ii) [Melancholy]

And in conclusion she shall watch all night,
  And if she chance to nod I'll rail and brawl
    And with the clamor keep her still awake.
      This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
        And thus I'll curb her mad and headstrong humor.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, i) [Matrimony]

And therefore 'tis called a sensible tale, and this cuff was but to knock at your ear, and beseech listening.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Grumio at IV, i)
        [Listening]

I tell thee, Kate, 'twas burnt and dried away,
  And I expressly am forbid to touch it,
    For it engenders choler, planteth anger,
      And better 'twere that both of us did fast,
        Since of ourselves, ourselves are choleric,
          Than feed it with such over-roasted flesh.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, i) [Anger]

My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
  And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
    For then she never looks upon her lure.
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, i) [Falcons]

Now were not I a little pot and soon hot, my very lips might freeze to my teeth, my tongue to the roof of my mouth, my heart in my belly, ere I should come by a fire to thaw me.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Grumio at IV, i)
        [Cookery]

Out of their saddles into the dirt--and thereby hangs a tale.
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Grumio at IV, i)
        [Story Telling]

'Tis burnt, and so is all the meat.
  What dogs are these! Where is the rascal cook?
    How durst you, villains, bring it from the dresser,
      And serve it thus to me that love it not?
      - The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, i) [Cookery]

Where's the cook? Is supper ready, the house trimmed, rushes strewed, cobwebs swept, the servingmen in their new fustian and white stockings, and every officer his wedding-garment on?
      - The Taming of the Shrew (Grumio at IV, i)
        [Cookery]


Displaying page 166 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 [166] 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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