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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 170 of 186    Next Page >> 

Setting aside his high blood's royalty,
  And let him be no kinsman to my liege,
    I do defy him and I spit at him,
      Call him a slanderous coward and a villain;
        Which to maintain, I would allow him odds
          And meet him, were I tied to run afoot
            Even to the frozen ridges of the Alps,
              Or any other ground inhabitable
                Where ever Englishman durst set his foot.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Mowbray at I, i) [Enemies]

Then, dear my liege, mine honor let me try;
  In that I live, and for that will I die.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Mowbray at I, i) [Honor]

We were not born to sue, but to command.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at I, i) [Leadership]

Grief boundeth where it falls,
  Not with the empty hollowness, but weight.
    I take my leave before I have begun,
      For sorrow ends not when it seemeth done.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Duchess of Gloucester at I, ii) [Sorrow]

That which in mean men we entitle patience
  Is pale cold cowardice in noble beasts.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Duchess of Gloucester at I, ii)
        [Cowardice]

All places that the eye of heaven visits,
  Are to a wise man ports and happy havens.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at I, iii) [Heaven : Proverbs]

For gnarling sorrow hath less power to bite
  The man, that mocks at it, and sets it light.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (John of Gaunt at I, iii) [Proverbs]

How long a time lies in one little word!
  Four lagging winters and four wanton springs
    End in a word, such is the breath of kings.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at I, iii) [Words]

Look what thy soul holds dear, imagine it
  To lie that way thou goest, not whence thou com'st.
    Suppose the singing birds musicians,
      The grass whereon thou tread'st the presence strewed,
        The flowers fair ladies, and thy steps no more
          Than a delight measure or a dance;
            For gnarling sorrow hath less power to bite
              The man that mocks at it and sets it light.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at I, iii) [Imagination]

Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite
  By bare imagination of a feast?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at I, iii) [Appetite]

Teach thy necessity to reason thus:
  There is no virtue like necessity.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at I, iii) [Necessity]

The language I have learnt these forty years,
  My native English, now I must forgo;
    And now my tongue's use is to me no more
      Than an unstringed viol or a harp,
        Or like a cunning instrument cased up
          Or, being open, put into his hands
            That knows no touch to tune the harmony.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Mowbray at I, iii) [Tongue]

Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at I, iii) [Eating]

We will ourself in person to this war;
  And, for our coffers, with too great a court
    And liberal largess, are grown somewhat light,
      We are enforced to farm our royal realm,
        The revenue whereof shall furnish us
          For our affairs in hand.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at I, iv) [Royalty]

Direct not him whose way himself will choose;
  'Tis breath not lack'st, and that breath wilt thou lose.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at II, i) [Advice]

For violent fires soon burn out themselves.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Proverbs]

His tongue is now a stringless instrument;
  Words, life, and all, old Lancaster hath spent.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Northumberland at II, i) [Singing]

Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
  And thus, expiring, do foretell of him:
    His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
      For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
        Small show'rs last long, but sudden storms are short;
          He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes;
            With eager feeding doth choke the feeder;
              Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
                Consuming means, soon preys upon itself.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Haste : Storms : Vanity]

No, misery makes sport to mock itself.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Misery]

O, but they say the tongues of dying men
  Enforce attention like deep harmony.
    Where words are scarce, they are seldom spent in vain,
      For they breathe truth that breathe their words in pain.
        He that no more must say is listened more
          Than they whom youth and ease have taught to glose.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Truth : Words]

Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gaunt at II, i) [Proverbs]

The king is come. Deal mildly with his youth;
  For young hot colts, being raged, do rage the more.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at II, i) [Horses]

The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
  His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at II, i) [Decay : Proverbs]

The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
  His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at II, i) [Decay : Proverbs]

The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he;
  His time is spent, our pilgrimage must be.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at II, i) [Fruits]


Displaying page 170 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 [170] 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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