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WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
English dramatist and poet
(1564 - 1616)
  CHECK READING LIST (43)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 172 of 186    Next Page >> 

I'll give my jewels for a set of beads. . . .
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, iii) [Jewels]

Let's march without the noise of threat'ning drum,
  That from this castle's tottered battlements
    Our fair appointments may be well perused.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Bolingbroke at III, iii) [War]

Yet looks he like a king. Behold, his eye,
  As bright as is the eagle's lightens forth
    Controlling majesty.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at III, iii) [Royalty]

You thus employed, I will go root away
  The noisome weeds which without profit suck
    The soil's fertility from wholesome flowers.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gardener at III, iii) [Weeds]

Gard'ner, for telling me these news of woe,
  Pray God the plants thou graft'st may never grow.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Queen at III, iv) [Growth]

Of neither, girl;
  For if of joy, being altogether wanting,
    It doth remember me the more of sorrow;
      Or if of grief, being altogether had,
        It adds more sorrow to my want of joy;
          For what I have I need not to repeat,
            And what I want it boots not to complain.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Queen at III, iv) [Sorrow]

We at time of year
  Do wound the bark, the skin of our fruit trees,
    Lest, being overproud in sap and blood,
      With too much riches it confound itself.
        Had he done so to great and growing men,
          They might have lived to bear, and he to taste
            Their fruits of duty. Superfluous branches
              We lop a way, that bearing boughs may live.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Gardener at III, iv) [Fruits]

His honor is as true
  In this appeal as thou art all unjust;
    And that thou art so, there I throw my gage
      To prove it on thee to the extremest point
        Of mortal breathing.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Percy at IV, i) [Challenge]

I give this heavy weight from off my head
  And this unwieldy sceptre from my hand,
    The pride of kingly sway from out my heart.
      With mine own tears I wash away my balm,
        With mine own hands I give away my crown,
          With mine own tongue deny my sacred state,
            With mine own breath release all duty's rites.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at IV, i) [Royalty]

My crown I am, but still my griefs are mine.
  You may my glories and my state depose,
    But not my griefs. Still am I king of those.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at IV, i) [Grief]

Nay, all of you that stand and look upon
  Whilst that my wretchedness doth bait myself,
    Though some of you, with Pilate, wash your hands,
      Showing an outward pity, yer you Pilates
        Have here delivered me to my sour cross,
          And water cannot wash away your sin.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at IV, i) [Sin]

O that I were a mockery king of snow,
  Standing before the sun of Bolingbroke
    To melt myself away in water drops!
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at IV, i) [Snow]

That honorable day shall never be seen.
  Many a time hath banished Norfolk fought
    For Jesu Christ in glorious Christian field,
      Streaming the ensign of the Christian cross
        Against black pagans, Turks, and Saracens;
          And, toiled with works of war, retired himself
            To Italy; and there, at Venice, gave
              His body to the pleasant country's earth
                And his pure soul unto his captain, Christ,
                  Under whose colors he had fought so long.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Carlisle at IV, i) [Death]

'Tis very true: my grief lies all within;
  And these external manners of laments
    Are merely shadows to the unseen grief
      That swells with silence in the tortured soul.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at IV, i) [Grief]

I see your brows are full of discontent,
  Your hearts of sorrow, and your eyes of tears.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Abbot at V, i) [Discontent]

Our holy lives must win a new world's crown,
  Which our profane hours here have thrown down.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, i) [Holiness]

The love of wicked men converts to fear;
  That fear to hate, and hate turns one or both
    To worthy danger and deserved death.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, i) [Change]

As in a theatre the eyes of men,
  After a well-graced actor leaves the stage,
    Are idly bent on him that enters next,
      Thinking his prattle to be tedious,
        Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes
          Did scowl on gentle Richard.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (York at V, ii) [Acting]

Who are the violets now
  That strew the green lap of the new-come spring?
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Duchess of York at V, ii) [Violets]

I pardon him as God shall pardon me.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Henry at V, iii) [Forgiveness]

Speak with me, pity me, open the door!
  A beggar begs that never begged before.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Duchess of York at V, iii)
        [Philanthropy]

How now! What means Death in this rude assault?
  Villain, thy own hand yields thy death's instrument.
    Go thou and fill another room in hell.
      That hand shall burn in never-quenching fire
        That staggers thus my person. Exton, thy fierce hand
          Hath with the king's blood stained the king's own land.
            Mount, mount, my soul! thy seat is up on high;
              Whilst my gross flesh sinks downward, here to die.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, v) [Death]

I have been studying how I may compare
  This prison where I live unto the world;
    And, for because the world is populous,
      And here is not a creature but myself,
        I cannot do it. Yet I'll hammer it out.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, v) [Prison]

Music do I hear?
  Ha--ha--keep time! How sour sweet music is
    When time is broke and no proportion kept!
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at V, v) [Music]

O, would the deed were good!
  For now the devil, that told me that I did well,
    Says that this deed is chronicled in hell.
      - The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Exton at V, v) [Deeds]


Displaying page 172 of 186 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 [172] 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186

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