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TACITUS (CAIUS CORNELIUS TACITUS)
Roman historian
(c. 55 - 117)
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When men are full of envy they disparage everything, whether it be good or bad.
      - [Envy]

When the state is most corrupt, then the laws are most multiplied.
      - [Law]

Zealous in the commencement, careless in the end.
      - [Proverbs]

Bodies are slow of growth, but are rapid in their dissolution.
  [Lat., Corpora lente augescent, cito extinguuntur.]
      - Agricola (II) [Change]

Rumor does not always err; it sometimes even elects a man.
      - Agricola (IX) [Rumor]

Flatterers are the worst kind of enemies.
  [Lat., Pessimum genus inimicorum laudantes.]
      - Agricola (XLI) [Flattery]

It is human nature to hate those whom we have injured.
  [Lat., Proprium humani ingenii, est odisse quem laeseris.]
      - Agricola (XLII, 4) [Hatred : Proverbs]

As he, though carried off in the prime of life, had lived long enough for glory.
  [Lat., Et ipse quidem, quamquam medio in spatio integrae aetatis ereptus, quantum ad gloriam, longissimum aevum peregit.]
      - Agricola (XLIV) [Glory]

Everything unknown is magnified.
  [Lat., Omne ignotum pro magnifico est.]
      - Agricola (XXX) [Ignorance]

To rob, to ravage, to murder, in their imposing language, are the arts of civil policy. When they have made the world a solitude, they call it peace.
  [Lat., Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium, atque, ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant.]
      - Agricola (XXX),
        ascribing the speech to Galgacus, Britain's leader against the Romans
        [Peace]

An honorable death is better than a dishonorable life.
  [Lat., Honesta mors turpi vita potior.]
      - Agricola (XXXIII) [Death]

We are corrupted by good fortune.
  [Lat., Felicitate corrumpimur.]
      - Annales (bk. I, 15) [Fortune]

Yet the age was not so utterly destitute of virtues but that it produced some good examples.
  [Lat., Non tamen adeo virtutum sterile seculum, ut non et bona exempla prodiderit.]
      - Annales (bk. I, 2) [Virtue]

Victor and vanquished never unite in substantial agreement.
  [Lat., Victores victosque numquam solida fide coalescere.]
      - Annales (bk. II, 7) [Victory]

To prefer victory to peace.
  [Lat., Victoriam malle quam pacem.]
      - Annales (bk. III, 60) [Victory]

Cassius and Brutus were the more distinguished for that very circumstance that their portraits were absent.
  [Lat., Praefulgebant Cassius atque Brutus eo ipso, quod effigies eorum non videbantur.]
      - Annales (bk. III, ch. 76),
        from the funeral of Junia [Absence]

Experience teaches.
  [Lat., Experientia docet.]
      - founded on Annales (bk. V, 6)
        [Experience : Proverbs]

A cowardly populace which will dare nothing beyond talk.
  [Lat., Vulgus ignavum et nihil ultra verba ausurum.]
      - Annales (bk. VI, 22) [Public]

The views of the multitude are neither bad nor good.
  [Lat., Neque mala, vel bona, quae vulgus putet.]
      - Annales (bk. VI, 22) [Public]

He (Tiberius) was wont to mock at the arts of physicians, and at those who, after thirty years of age, needed counsel as to what was good or bad for their bodies.
      - Annales (bk. VI, ch. XLVI) [Medicine]

Such being the happiness of the times, that you may think as you wish, and speak as you think.
  [Lat., Rara temporum felicitate, ubi sentire quae velis, et quae sentias dicere licet.]
      - Annales (I, 1) [Freedom]

Rulers always hate and suspect the next in succession.
  [Lat., Suspectum semper invisumque dominantibus qui proximus destinaretur.]
      - Annales (I, 21) [Power]

Power acquired by guilt was never used for a good purpose.
  [Lat., Imperium flagitio acquisitum nemo unquam bonis artibus exercuit.]
      - Annales (I, 30) [Power : Proverbs]

In the opinion of all men he would have been regarded as capable of governing, if he had never governed.
  [Lat., Omnium consensu capax imperii, nisi imperasset.]
      - Annales (I, 49) [Government]

Laying aside his resentment, he stores it up to bring it forward with increased bitterness.
  [Lat., Odia in longum jaciens, quae reconderet, auctaque promeret.]
      - Annales (I, 69) [Revenge]


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