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BAYARD TAYLOR
American poet, traveler, novelist and translator
(1825 - 1878)
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And half in shade and half in sun;
  The Rose sat in her bower,
    With a passionate thrill in her crimson heart.
      - Poems of the Orient--The Poet in the East
         (st. 5) [Roses]

The Poet's leaves are gathered one by one,
  In the slow process of the doubtful years.
      - Poet's Journal--Third Evening [Poets]

For love's humility is Love's true pride.
      - Poet's Journal--Third Evening--The Mother
        [Love]

I know I am--that simplest bliss
  The millions of my brothers miss.
    I know the fortune to be born,
      Even to the meanest wretch they scorn.
      - Prince Deukalion (act IV) [Bliss]

The hearts that dare are quick to feel;
  The hands that wound are soft to heal.
      - Soldiers of Peace [Character]

And rest, that strengthens unto virtuous deeds,
  Is one with Prayer.
      - Temptation of Hassan Ben Khaled (st. 4)
        [Rest]

Next to thee, O fair gazelle,
  O Beddowee girl, beloved so well;
    Next to the fearless Nedjidee,
      Whose fleetness shall bear me again to thee;
        Next to ye both I love the Palm,
          With his leaves of beauty, his fruit of balm;
            Next to ye both I love the Tree
              Whose fluttering shadow wraps us three
                With love, and silence, and mystery!
      - The Arab to the Palm [Palm]

A waft from the roadside bank
  Tells where the wild rose nods.
      - The Guests of Night [Wild Roses]

The hollows are heavy and dank
  With the steam of the Goldenrods.
      - The Guests of Night [Goldenrods]

When May, with cowslip-braided locks,
  Walks through the land in green attire.
    And burns in meadow-grass the phlox
      His torch of purple fire:
        . . . .
          And when the punctual May arrives,
            With cowslip-garland on her brow,
              We know what once she gave our lives,
                And cannot give us now!
      - The Lost May [May]

Twas glory once to be a Roman;
  She makes it glory, now, to be a man.
      - The National Ode [Glory]

Death is not rare, alas! nor burials few,
  And soon the grassy coverlet of God
    Spreads equal green above their ashes pale.
      - The Picture of St. John (bk. III, st. 84)
        [Death]

There may come a day
  Which crowns Desire with gift, and Art with truth,
    And Love with bliss, and Life with wiser youth!
      - The Picture of St. John (bk. IV, st. 86)
        [Success]

Ancient Pines,
  Ye bear no record of the years of man.
    Spring is your sole historian.
      - The Pine Forest of Monterey [Pine]

Stately Pines,
  But few more years around the promontory
    Your chant will meet the thunders of the sea.
      - The Pine Forest of Monterey [Pine]

Alone each heart must cover up its dead;
  Alone, through bitter toil, achieve its rest.
      - The Poet's Journal--First Evening--Conclusion
        [Solitude]

Because the gift of Song was chiefly lent,
  To give consoling music for the joys
    We lack, and not for those which we possess.
      - The Poet's Journal--Third Evening [Songs]

But still I dream that somewhere there must be
  The spirit of a child that waits for me.
      - The Poet's Journal--Third Evening
        [Childhood]

Shelved around us lie
  The mummied authors.
      - The Poet's Journal--Third Evening
        [Libraries]

And yonder fly his scattered golden arrows,
  And smite the hills with day.
      - The Poet's Journal--Third Evening--Morning
        [Morning : Sunrise]

But who will watch my lilies,
  When their blossoms open white?
    By day the sun shall be sentry,
      And the moon and the stars by night!
      - The Poets' Journal--The Garden of Roses
         (st. 14) [Lilies]

Shrimps and the delicate periwinkle
  Such are the sea-fruits lasses love:
    Ho! to your nets till the blue stars twinkle,
      And the shutterless cottages gleam above!
      - The Shrimp-Gatherers [Fishing]

Sleep, soldiers! still in honored rest
  Your truth and valor wearing:
    The bravest are the tenderest,--
      The loving are the daring.
      - The Song of the Camp [Soldiers]

We follow and race
  In shifting chase,
    Over the boundless ocean-space!
      Who hath beheld when the race begun?
        Who shall behold it run?
      - The Waves [Ocean]

By Wisdom wealth is won;
  But riches purchased wisdom yet for none.
      - The Wisdom of Ali [Wisdom]


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