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LORD ALFRED TENNYSON
English poet laureate
(1809 - 1892)
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Smit with exceeding sorrow unto Death.
      - The Lover's Tale (l. 597) [Sorrow]

All in the wild March-morning I heard the angels call;
  It was when the moon was setting, and the dark was over all;
    The trees began to whisper, and the wind began to roll,
      And in the wild March-morning I heard them call my soul.
      - The May Queen (conclusion) [March]

For I'm to be Queen o' the May, mother, I'm to be Queen o' the May.
      - The May Queen (st. 1) [May]

And by the meadow-trenches blow the faint sweet cuckoo-flowers.
      - The May Queen (st. 8) [Cowslips]

It seem'd so hard at first, mother, to leave the blessed sun,
  And now it seems as hard to stay--and yet His will be done!
    But still I think it can't be long before I find release;
      And that good man, the clergyman, has told me words of peace.
      - The May-Queen--Conclusion (st. 3)
        [Resignation]

Who would be
  A mermaid fair,
    Singing alone,
      Combing her hair
        Under the sea,
          In a golden curl
            With a comb of pearl,
              On a throne?
                I would be a mermaid fair;
                  I would sing to myself the whole of the day;
                    With a comb of pearl I would comb my hair;
                      And still as I comb I would sing and say,
                        "Who is it loves me? who loves not me?"
      - The Mermaid [Mermaids]

In after-dinner talk,
  Across the walnuts and the wine.
      - The Miller's Daughter [Story Telling]

I watch'd the little circles die;
  They past into the level flood.
      - The Miller's Daughter (st. 10) [Circles]

Love is hurt with jar and fret;
  Love is made a vague regret.
      - The Miller's Daughter (st. 28) [Love]

What profits now to understand
  The merits of a spotless shirt--
    A dapper boot--a little hand--
      If half the little soul is dirt.
      - The New Timon and the Poets,
        appeared in "Punch", Feb. 28, 1846, signed Alcibiades
        [Soul]

I built my soul a lordly pleasure-house,
  Wherein at ease for aye to dwell.
      - The Palace of Art (st. 1) [Pleasure]

And rolling far along the gloomy shores
  The voice of days of old and days to be.
      - The Passing of Arthur [Voice]

As if some lesser God had made the world,
  And had not-force to shape it as he would.
      - The Passing of Arthur (l. 14) [Creation]

The poet in a golden clime was born,
  With golden stars above;
    Dower'd with the hate of hate, the scorn of scorn,
      The love of love.
      - The Poet [Poets]

The wild hawk stood with the down on his beak
  And stared with his foot on the prey.
      - The Poet's Song [Hawks]

O we fell out, I know not why,
  And kiss'd again with tears.
      - The Princess (canto II, song) [Quarreling]

Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
  Tears from the depths of some divine despair.
      - The Princess (canto IV, l. 21) [Tears]

The water-lily starts and slides
  Upon the level in little puffs of wind,
    Tho' anchor'd to the bottom.
      - The Princess (IV, l. 236) [Water Lilies]

There sinks the nebulous star we call the sun.
      - The Princess (pt. IV) [Sun]

Home they brought her warrior dead.
      - The Princess (song at end of canto V)
        [Soldiers]

The woman is so hard
  Upon the woman.
      - The Princess (VI) [Women]

For woman is not undeveloped man
  But diverse; could we make her as the man
    Sweet love were slain; his dearest bond is this
      Not like to like but like in difference.
      - The Princess (VII) [Women]

Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves
  A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.
      - The Princess (VII) [Meteors]

Now folds the lily all her sweetness up,
  And slips into the bosom of the lake;
    So fold thyself, my dearest, thou, and slip
      Into my bosom, and be lost in me.
      - The Princess (VII, l. 171) [Water Lilies]

With prudes for proctors, dowagers for deans,
  And sweet girl-graduates in their golden hair.
      - The Princess--Prologue (l. 141) [Women]


Displaying page 16 of 18 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 18

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