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VIRGIL OR VERGIL (PUBLIUS VIRGILIUS MARO VERGIL)
Roman epic, didactic and idyllic poet
(70 BC - 19 BC)
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But meanwhile time flies; it flies never to be regained.
  [Lat., Sed fugit interea, fugit irreparabile tempus.]
      - Georgics (III, 284) [Time]

His neck is high and erect, his head replete with intelligence, his belly short, his back full, and his proud chest swells with hard muscles.
  [Lat., Ardua cervix,
    Argumtumque caput, brevis alvos, obessaque terga,
      Luxuriatque toris animosum pectus.]
      - Georgics (III, 79) [Horses]

The fates call.
  [Lat., Fata vocant.]
      - Georgics (IV, 496) [Fate]

The object of the labor was small, but not the fame.
  [Lat., In tenui labor, at tenuis non gloria.]
      - Georgics (IV, 6) [Fame]

Who asks whether the enemy was defeated by strategy or valor?
  [Lat., Dolus an virtus quis in hoste requirat?]
      - II, 390 [War]

Arms, and the man I sing, who, forced by fate,
  And haughty Juno's unrelenting hate,
    Expelled and exiled, left the Trojan shore.
      [Lat., Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris
        Italiam, fato profugus, Laviniaque venit
          Litora, multum ille et terris iactatus et alto
            Vi superum saevae memorem Iunonis ob iram.]
      - The Aeneid, (Dryden's translation)
        [Books (First Lines) : War]

I sing of arms and the man.
      - The Aeneid [Books (First Lines)]

He utters empty words, he utters sound without mind.
  [Lat., Dat inania verba,
    Dat sine mente sonum.]
      - The Aeneid (10, 639) [Words]

She (Fame) walks on the earth, and her head is concealed in the clouds.
  [Lat., Ingrediturque solo, et caput inter nubila condit.]
      - The Aeneid (4, 177) [Fame]

The fame (or report) has become obscure through age.
  [Lat., Fama est obscurior annis.]
      - The Aeneid (7, 205) [Fame]

In the throat
  Of Hell, before the very vestibule
    Of opening Orcus, sit Remorse and Grief,
      And pale Disease, and sad Old Age and Fear,
        And Hunger that persuades to crime, and Want:
          Forms terrible to see. Suffering and Death
            Inhabit here, and Death's own brother Sleep;
              And the mind's evil lusts and deadly War,
                Lie at the threshold, and the iron beds
                  Of the Eumenides; and Discord wild
                    Her viper-locks with bloody fillets bound.
      - The Aeneid (bk. VI, l. 336),
        (C.P. Cranch's translation) [Hell]

Deep rest and sweet, most like indeed to death's own quietness.
      - The Aeneid (bk. VI, l. 522),
        (William Morris' translation) [Sleep]

Can heavenly minds such anger entertain?
  [Lat., Tantaene animis coelestibus irae.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 11) [Anger]

A few swimming in the vast deep.
  [Lat., Rari nantes in gurgite vasto.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 118) [Ocean]

Here and there they are seen swimming in the vast flood.
  [Lat., Apparent rari nantes in gurgite vasto.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 118) [Shipwreck]

The rude rabble are enraged; now firebrands and stones fly.
  [Lat., Saevitque animis ignoble vulgus,
    Jamque faces et saxa volant.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 149) [Public]

Their rage supplies them with weapons.
  [Lat., Furor arma ministrat.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 150) [Anger]

God will put an end to these also.
  [Lat., Debit deus his quoque finem.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 199) [Future]

Perhaps the remembrance of these things will prove a source of future pleasure.
  [Lat., Forsan et haec olim meminisse juvabit.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 203) [Memory]

Persevere and preserve yourselves for better circumstances.
  [Lat., Durate, et vosmet rebus servate secundis.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 207) [Patience]

The god so willing.
  [Lat., Volente Deo.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 303) [Gods]

But I will trace the footsteps of the chief events.
  [Lat., Sed summa sequar fastigia rerum.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 342) [Footsteps]

A woman was leader in the deed.
  [Lat., Dux femina facti.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 364) [Women]

By her gait the goddess was known.
  [Lat., Incessu patuit Dea.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 405) [Gods]

What region of the earth is not full of our calamities?
  [Lat., Quae regio in terris nostri non plena laboris.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 460) [Affliction]


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