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VIRGIL OR VERGIL (PUBLIUS VIRGILIUS MARO VERGIL)
Roman epic, didactic and idyllic poet
(70 BC - 19 BC)
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Tears are due to human misery, and human sufferings touch the mind.
  [Lat., Sunt lacrymae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 462) [Tears]

If ye despise the human race, and mortal arms, yet remember that there is a God who is mindful of right and wrong.
  [Lat., Si genus humanum et mortalia temnitis arma,
    At sperate deos memores fandi atque nefandi.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 542) [God]

A mind conscious of its own rectitude.
  [Lat., Mens sibi conscia recti.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 604) [Mind : Proverbs]

Being myself no stranger to suffering, I have learned to relieve the sufferings of others.
  [Lat., Non ignara mali miseris succurrere disco.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 630) [Philanthropy]

O thrice, four times happy they!
  [Lat., O terque quaterque beati.]
      - The Aeneid (I, 94) [Happiness]

What each man feared would happen to himself, did not trouble him when he saw that it would ruin another.
  [Lat., Etiam quae sibi quisque timebat
    Unius in miseri exitium conversa tulere.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 130) [Ruin]

The supreme day has come and the inevitable hour,
  [Lat., Venit summa dies et ineluctabile tempus.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 324) [Death]

We have been Trojans; Troy was.
  [Lat., Fuimus Troes; fuit Ilium.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 324) [Cities]

The only safety for the conquered is to expect no safety.
  [Lat., Una salus victis nullam sperare salutem.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 354) [War]

The uncertain multitude is divided by opposite opinions.
      - The Aeneid (II, 39) [Public]

Alas! it is not well for anyone to be confident when the gods are adverse.
  [Lat., Heu nihil invitis fas quemquam fidere divis.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 402) [Gods]

I fear the Greeks, even when they bring gifts.
  [Lat., Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 49) [Gifts : Proverbs]

From one learn all.
  [Lat., Ab uno disce omnes.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 65) [Learning]

Learn now of the treachery of the Greeks, and from one example the character of the nation may be known.
  [Lat., Accipe nunc Danaum insidias, et crimine ab uno
    Disce omnes.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 65) [Character]

Whatever may be the issue we shall share one common danger, one safety.
  [Lat., Quo res cunque cadant, unum et commune periculum,
    Una salus ambobus erit.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 709) [Unity]

He follows his father with unequal steps.
  [Lat., Sequiturque patrem non passibus aequis.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 724) [Example]

My voice stuck in my throat.
  [Lat., Vox faucibus haesit.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 774) [Voice]

I was astounded, my hair stood on end, and my voice stuck in my throat.
  [Lat., Obstupui, steteruntque comae, et vox faucibus haesit.]
      - The Aeneid (II, 774 and III, 48) [Fear]

Be happy ye, whose fortunes are already completed.
  [Lat., Vivite felices, quibus est fortuna peracta
    Jam sua.]
      - The Aeneid (III, 493) [Contentment]

Accursed thirst for gold! what dost thou not compel mortals to do?
  [Lat., Quid non mortalia pectora cogis,
    Auri sacra fames?]
      - The Aeneid (III, 56) [Gold]

We are carried up to the heaven by the circling wave, and immediately the wave subsiding, we descend to the lowest depths.
  [Lat., Tollimus in caelum curvato gurgite, et idem
    Subducta ad manes imos descendimus unda.]
      - The Aeneid (III, 564) [Fortune]

A monster frightful, formless, immense, with sight removed.
  [Lat., Monstrum horrendum, informe, ingens, cui lumen ademptum.]
      - The Aeneid (III, 658) [Sight]

An immense, misshapen, marvelous monster whose eye is out.
  [Lat., Monstrum horrendum, informe, ingens, cui lumen ademptum.]
      - The Aeneid (III, 658) [Appearance]

To give the sails to fate.
  [Lat., Dare fatis vela.]
      - The Aeneid (III, 9) [Fate]

Fear in the proof of a degenerate mind.
  [Lat., Degeneres animos timor arguit.]
      - The Aeneid (IV, 13) [Fear]


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