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GEORGE WASHINGTON
American 1st president of U.S.
(1732 - 1799)
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Religion is as necessary to reason as reason is to religion. The one cannot exist without the other. A reasoning being would lose his reason, in attempting to account for the great phenomena of nature, had he not a Supreme Being to refer to; and well has it been said, that if there had been no God, mankind would have been obliged to imagine one.
      - [Religion]

Republicanism is not the phantom of a deluded imagination. On the contrary, laws, under no form of government, are better supported, liberty and property better secured, or happiness more effectually dispensed to mankind.
      - [Republic]

Submit your sentiments with diffidence. A dictatorial style, though it may carry conviction, is always accompanied with disgust.
      - [Style]

Such, for wise purposes it is presumed, is the turbulence of human passions in party disputes, when victory, more than truth, is the palm contended for, that "the post of honor is a private station."
      - [Politics]

That a national university in this country is a thing to be desired, has always been my decided opinion.
      - [Universities]

The aggregate happiness of society, which is best promoted by the practice of a virtuous policy, is, or ought to be, the end of all government.
      - [Government]

The company in which you will improve most will be least expensive to you.
      - [Associates]

The consideration that human happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected will always continue to prompt me to promote the progress of the former by inculcating the practice of the latter.
      - [Duty]

The foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing is a vice so mean and low that every person of sense and character detests and despises it.
      - [Profanity]

The friendship I have conceived will not be impaired by absence; but it may be no unpleasing circumstance to brighten the chain by a renewal of the covenant.
      - [Friendship]

The General is sorry to be informed that the foolish and wicked practise of profane cursing and swearing, a vice hitherto little known in an American army, is growing into fashion. He hopes the officers will, by example, as well as influence, endeavor to check it, and that both they and the men will reflect that we can have little hope of the blessing of heaven on our arms, if we insult it by our impiety and folly. Added to this, it is a vice so mean and low, without any temptation, that every man of sense and character detests and despises it.
      - [Washington, George]

The name American must always exalt the just pride of patriotism.
      - [Washington, George]

The power of making war often prevents it, and in our case would give efficacy to our desire of peace.
      - [War]

The propitious smiles of heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which heaven itself has ordained.
      - [Washington, George]

The pure and benign light of revelation has had a meliorating influence on mankind.
      - [Christianity]

The thinking part of mankind do not form their judgment from events; and their equity will ever attach equal glory to those actions which deserve success, and those which have been crowned with it.
      - [Success]

The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of a brave resistance or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or to die. Our own, our country's honor, calls upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion; and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous before the whole world. Let us, then, rely on the goodness of our cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being, in whose hands victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble actions. The eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us; and we shall have their blessings and praises if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny meditated against them. Let us, therefore, animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a freeman contending for liberty on his own ground, is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.
      - first part of his address to the American troops before the Battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776; see "Liberty, property, life, and honor . . ."
        [Washington, George]

The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.
      - [Government]

There can be no greater error than to expect or calculate upon real favors from nation to nation.
      - [Washington, George]

There is an indissoluble union between a magnanimous policy and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity.
      - [Politics]

There is an opinion that parties in free countries are useful checks upon the administration of the government, and serve to keep alive the spirit of liberty. This, within certain limits, is probably true, and, in governments of a monarchical cast, patriotism may look with indulgence, if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in those of the popular character, in governments purely elective, it is a spirit not to be encouraged.
      - [Party]

There is no restraining men's tongues or pens when charged with a little vanity.
      - [Vanity]

There is not a man living who wishes more sincerely than I do to see a plan adopted for the abolition of slavery.
      - [Slavery]

There is nothing so likely to produce peace as to be well prepared to meet the enemy.
      - [Peace]

This is a vice which is productive of every possible evil, equally injurious to the morals and health of its votaries. It is the child of avarice, the brother of iniquity, and the father of mischief. It has been the ruin of many worthy families; the loss of many a man's honor, and the cause of suicide. To all those who enter the lists, it is equally fascinating. The successful gamester pushes his good fortune, till it is overtaken by a reverse. The losing gamester, in hopes of retrieving past misfortunes, goes on from bad to worse, till, grown desperate, he pushes at everything and loses his all. In a word, few gain by this abominable practice, while thousands are injured.
      - [Gambling]


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