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HONOR
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[ Also see Applause Ceremony Character Conscience Constancy Dignity Disgrace Distinction Esteem Fame Fidelity Glory Greatness Honesty Integrity Morality Names Principles Reputation Respect Responsibility Reverence Scandal Shame Truth ]

The due of honor in no point omit.
      - William Shakespeare

The purest treasure mortal times afford
  Is spotless reputation; that away,
    Men are but gilded loam, or painted clay.
      - William Shakespeare

Well, 'tis no matter; honor pricks me on. Yea, but how if honor prick me off, when I come on? how then? Can honor set to a leg? no. or an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no: Honor hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is honor? a word. What is in that word honor? What is that honor? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth he hear it? no. 'Tis insensible, then. Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore, I'll none of it. Honor is a mere scutcheon; and so ends my catechism.
      - William Shakespeare

Whether I live or die, be you the sons
  Of worthy Frenchmen. Let Higher Italy
    (Those bated that inherit but the fall
      Of the last monarchy) see that you come
        Not to woo honor, but to wed it, when
          The bravest questant shrinks: find what you seek,
            That fame may cry you loud. I say, farewell.
      - William Shakespeare,
        All's Well That Ends Well
         (King of France at II, i)

That is honor's scorn
  Which challenges itself as honor's born
    And is not like the sire. Honors thrive
      When rather from our acts we them derive
        Than our foregoers.
      - William Shakespeare,
        All's Well That Ends Well
         (King of France at II, iii)

A scar nobly got, or a noble scar, is a good livery of honor; so belike is that.
      - William Shakespeare,
        All's Well That Ends Well
         (Lafew at IV, v)

If I lose my honor,
  I lose myself: better I were not yours
    Than yours so branchless.
      - William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra
         (Antony at III, iv)

Would you, in their serving,
  And with what imitation you can borrow
    From youth of such a season, 'fore noble Lucius
      Present yourself, desire his service, tell him
        Wherein you're happy, which will make him know,
          If that his head have ear in music; doubtless
            With joy he will embrace you, for he's honorable,
              And, doubling that, most holy.
      - William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
         (Pisanio at III, iv)

Here under leave of Brutus and the rest
  (For Brutus is an honorable man;
    So are they all, all honorable men),
      Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
        He was my friend, faithful and just to me;
          But Brutus says he was ambitious,
            And Brutus is an honorable man.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Antony at III, ii)

Thou art a fellow of a good respect;
  Thy life hath had some smatch of honor in it.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Brutus at V, v)

By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap
  To pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon,
    Or dive into the bottom of the deep,
      Where fathom line could never touch the ground,
        And pluck up drowned honor by the locks,
          So he that doth redeem her thence might wear
            Without corrival all her dignities;
              But out upon this half-faced fellowship!
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at I, iii)

Greatness knows itself.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at IV, iii)

'Tis not due yet: I would be loath to pay him before his day. What need I be so forward with him that calls not on me? Well, 'tis no matter; honor pricks me on. Yea, but how if honor prick me off when I come on? How then? Can honor set to a leg? No. Or an arm? No. Or take away the grief of a wound? No. Honor hath no skill in surgery them? No. What is honor? A word. What is that word honor? Air--a trim reckoning! Who hath it? He that died a Wednesday. Doth he feel it? No. Doth he hear it? No. 'Tis insensible then? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? No. Why? Detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I'll none of it. Honor is a mere scutcheon--and so ends my catechism.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at V, i)

Take the instant way;
  For honor travels in a strait so narrow
    Where one but goes abreast.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The History of Troilus and Cressida
         (Ulysses at III, iii)

O that estates, degrees, and offices
  Were not derived corruptly, and that clear honor
    Were purchased by the merit of the wearer!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Merchant of Venice
         (Prince of Arragon at II, ix)   BUY VARYING HARE USED BOOK  

Well, come, my Kate; we will unto your father's,
  Even in these honest mean habiliments.
    Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor,
      For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich;
        And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds
          So honor peereth in the meanest habit.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Taming of the Shrew
         (Petruchio at IV, iii)

No, precious creature;
  I had rather crack my sinews, break my back,
    Than you should such dishonor undergo
      While I sit lazy by.
      - William Shakespeare, The Tempest
         (Ferdinand at III, i)

Then, dear my liege, mine honor let me try;
  In that I live, and for that will I die.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Mowbray at I, i)

The most tragic thing in the world is a man of genius who is not a man of honor.
      - George Bernard Shaw

You cannot believe in honor until you have achieved it, better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.
      - George Bernard Shaw

Honour sits smiling at the sale of truth.
      - Percy Bysshe Shelley, Queen Mab
         (canto IV, l. 218)

To be ambitious of true honor, of the true glory and perfection of our natures, is the very principle and incentive of virtue; but to be ambitious of titles, of place, of ceremonial respects and civil pageantry, is as vain and little as the things are which we court.
      - Thomas Sherlock

High honor is not only gotten and born by pain and danger, but must be nursed by the like, else it vanisheth as soon as it appears to the world.
      - Sir Philip Sidney (Sydney)

Honor, thou strong idol of man's mind.
      - Sir Philip Sidney (Sydney)

The journey of high honor lies not in smooth ways.
      - Sir Philip Sidney (Sydney)


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