GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Biographical
Name List
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
SubAnagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


LINGUISTS
[ Also see Conversation Education Language Learning Speech Words ]

Besides 'tis known he could speak Greek
  As naturally as pigs squeak;
    That Latin was no more difficile
      That to a blackbird 'tis to whistle.
      - Samuel Butler (1), Hudibras
         (pt. I, canto I, l. 51)

A Babylonish dialect
  Which learned pedants much affect.
      - Samuel Butler (1), Hudibras
         (pt. I, canto I, l. 93)

For though to smatter ends of Greek
  Or Latin be the rhetoric
    Of pedants counted, and vain-glorious,
      To smatter French is meritorious.
      - Samuel Butler (1),
        Remains in Verse and Prose--Satire--Upon Our Ridiculous Imitation of the French
         (line 127),
        a Greek proverb condemns the man of two tongues

I love the language, that soft bastard Latin,
  Which melts like kisses from a female mouth.
      - Lord Byron (George Gordon Noel Byron),
        Beppo (st. 44)

. . . Philologists, who chase
  A painting syllable through time and space
    Start it at home, and hunt it in the dark,
      To Gaul, to Greece, and into Noah's Ark.
      - William Cowper, Retirement (l. 691)

He Greek and Latin speaks with greater ease
  Than hogs eat acorns, and tame pigeons peas.
      - Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex,
        Panegyric on Tom Coriate

Lashed into Latin by the tingling rod.
      - John Gay

Lash'd into Latin by the tingling rod.
      - John Gay, The Birth of the Squire (l. 46)

He who is ignorant of foreign languages, knows not his own.
  [Ger., Wer fremde Sprachen nicht kennt, weiss nichts von seiner eigenen.]
      - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe,
        Kunst und Alterthum

Small Latin, and less Greek.
      - Ben Jonson, To the Memory of Shakespeare

Everything is Greek, when it is more shameful to be ignorant of Latin.
  [Lat., Omnia Graece!
    Cum sit turpe magis nostris nescire Latine.]
      - Juvenal (Decimus Junius Juvenal), Satires
         (VI, 187),
        (second line said to be spurious)

Languages are no more than the keys of Sciences. He who despises one, slights the other.
      - Jean de la Bruyere,
        The Characters or Manners of the Present Age
         (ch. XII)

It is Hebrew to me.
  [Fr., C'est de l'hebreu pour moi.]
      - Moliere (pseudonym of Jean Baptiste Poquelin),
        L'Etourdi (act III, sc. 3)

He attempts to use language which he does not know.
  [Lat., Negatas artifex sequi voces.]
      - Persius (Aulus Persius Flaccus),
        Satires--Prologue (XI)

Speaks three or four languages word for word without a book.
      - William Shakespeare

This is your devoted friend, sir, the manifold linguist and the armipotent soldier.
      - William Shakespeare,
        All's Well That Ends Well
         (Second Lord at IV, iii)

But those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads; but for mine own part, if was Greek to me.
      - William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
         (Casca at I, ii)

Away with him, away with him! He speaks Latin.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Cade at IV, vii)

O, good my lord, no Latin!
  I am not such a truant since my coming
    As not to know the language I have lived in.
      A strnage tongue makes my cause more strnage, suspicious.
        Pray speak in English.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Katherine at III, i)

But to the purpose--for we cite our faults
  That they may hold excused our lawless lives;
    And partly, seeing you are beautified
      With goodly shape, and by your own report
        A linguist, and a man of such perfection
          As we do in our quality much want--
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Two Gentlemen of Verona
         (First Outlaw at IV, i)

He plays o' th' viol-de-gamboys, and speaks three or four languages word for word without book, and hath all the good gifts of nature.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Twelfth Night, or, What You Will
         (Toby at I, iii)

Egad, I think the interpreter is the hardest to be understood of the two!
      - Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The Critic
         (act I, sc. 2)


 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books