GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Biographical
Name List
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
SubAnagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


WAR
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 21 of 25    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Adventure America Army Atomic Bombs Battle Bravery Conquest Conspiracy Contention Courage Cowardice Cowards Cruelty Daring Democracy Diplomacy Dissension Enemies Fame Fighting Flags Force Freedom Glory Government Heroes History Independence Killing Liberty Love of Country Military Murder Nationalism Navy Opposition Pacification Pacifism Patriotism Peace Perils Policy Politics Providence Quarreling Rebellion Revolution Rights Rivalry Royalty Soldiers Statesmanship Strategy Treachery Treason Tyranny Valor Victory Violence Washington, George Weapons World Peace Wounds Youth ]

They come like sacrifices in their trim,
  And to the fire-eyed maid of smoky war
    All hot and bleeding will we offer them.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at IV, i)

Tut, tut! good enough to toss; food for powder, food for powder. They'll fill a pit as well as better.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at IV, ii)

Now for our consciences, the arms are fair,
  When the intent of bearing them is just.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Hotspur at V, ii)

Our battle is more full of names than yours,
  Our men more perfect in the use of arms,
    Our armor all as strong, our cause is best,
      Then reason will our hearts should be as good.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Westmoreland at IV, i)

He saw me, and yielded, that I may justly say, with the hooked-nosed fellow of Rome, their Caesar, 'I came, saw and overcame.'
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part II
         (Falstaff at IV, iii)

O war, thou son of hell,
  Whom angry heavens do make their minister,
    Throw in the frozen bosoms of our part
      Hot coals of vengeance. Let no soldier fly.
        He that is truly dedicate to war
          Hath no self-love; nor he that loves himself
            Hath not essentially, but by circumstance,
              The name of valor.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part II
         (Young Clifford at V, ii)

It is war's prize to take all vantages;
  And ten to one is no impeach of valor.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Northumberland at I, iv)

Sound trumpets! Let our bloody colors wave,
  And either victory, or else a grave!
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (Edward, Prince of Wales at II, ii)

They shall have wars and pay for their presumption.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Sixth, Part III
         (King Edward at IV, i)

Be thou as lightning in the eyes of France;
  For ere thou can'st report I will be there,
    The thunder of my cannon shall be heard;
      So hence! Be thou the trumpet of our wrath.
      - William Shakespeare, King John

When the hurlyburly is done,
  When the battle's lost and won.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Second Witch at I, i)

Blow wind, come wrack,
  At least we'll die with harness on our back.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at V, v)

Hang out our banners on the outward walls.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at V, v)

Lay on, Macduff,
  And damned be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!'
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at V, viii)

The cannons have their bowels full of wrath,
  And ready mounted are they to spit forth
    Their iron indignation 'gainst your walls.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (King John at II, i)

Now for the bare-picked bone of majesty
  Doth dogged war bristle his angry crest
    And snarleth in the gentle eyes of peace.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Bastard at IV, iii)

Outside or inside, I will not return
  Till my attempt so much be glorified
    As to my ample hope was promised
      Before I drew this gallant head of war,
        And culled there fiery spirits from the world,
          To outlook conquest and to win renown
            Even in the jaws of danger and of death.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at V, ii)

Your breath first kindled the dead coal of wars
  Between this chastised kingdom and myself,
    And brought in matter that should feed this fire;
      And now 'tis far too huge to be blown out
        With the same weak wind which enkindled it.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life and Death of King John
         (Lewis at V, ii)

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more,
  Or close the wall up with our English dead!
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at III, i)

From camp to camp, through the foul womb of night,
  The hum of either army stilly sounds,
    That the fixed sentinels almost receive
      The secret whispers of each other's watch.
        Fire answers fire, and through their paly flames
          Each battle sees the other's umbered face.
            Steed threatens steed, in high and boastful neighs
              Piercing the night's dull ear; and from the tents
                The armorers accomplishing the knights,
                  With busy hammers closing rivets up,
                    Give dreadful note of preparation.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Chorus at IV, chorus)

I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle; for how can they charitably dispose of anything when blood is their argument?
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (Michael Williams at IV, i)

Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
  That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
    Let him depart; his passport shall be made,
      And crowns for convoy put into his purse.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Fifth
         (King Henry at IV, iii)

Follow thy drum;
  With man's blood paint the ground, gules, gules!
    Religious canons, civil laws are cruel;
      Then what should war be? This fell whore of thine
        Hath in her more destruction than thy sword
          For all her cherubin look.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of Timon of Athens
         (Timon at IV, iii)

The bay trees in our country all are withered,
  And meteors fright the fixed stars of heaven;
    The pale-faced moon look bloody on the earth,
      And lean-looked prophets whisper fearful change;
        Rich men look sad, and ruffians dance and leap--
          The one in fear to lose what they enjoy,
            The other to enjoy by rage and war.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (Welsh Captain at II, iv)

He is come to open
  The purple testament of bleeding war.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Tragedy of King Richard the Second
         (King Richard at III, iii)


Displaying page 21 of 25 for this topic:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books