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FRANCIS BACON
English philosopher, statesman and writer
(1561 - 1626)
  CHECK READING LIST (4)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 7 of 15    Next Page >> 

Lookers-on many times see more than gamesters.
      - [Gambling]

Lukewarm persons think they may accommodate points of religion by middle ways and witty reconcilements,--as if they would make an arbitrament between God and man.
      - [Religion]

Man seeketh in society comfort, use and protection.
      - [Society]

Many a man's strength is in opposition, and when he faileth, he groweth out of use.
      - [Opposition]

Many have made witty invectives against usury. They say that it is a pity the devil should have God's part, which is the tithe; that the usurer is the greatest Sabbath-breaker, because his plough goeth every Sunday.
      - [Usury]

Mathematics are the most abstracted of knowledge.
      - [Mathematics]

Measure not dispatch by the time of sitting, but by the advancement of business.
      - [Business]

Men believe that their reason governs their words; but it often happens the words have power to react on reason.
      - [Words]

Men commonly think according to their inclinations, speak according to their learning and imbibed opinions, but generally act according to custom.
      - [Action]

Men in great places are thrice servants,--servants of the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business; so that they have no freedom, neither in their persons, nor in their actions, nor in their times.
      - [Servitude : Station]

Men leave their riches either to their kindred or their friends, and moderate portions prosper best in both.
      - [Riches]

Men of noble birth are noted to be envious towards new men when they rise; for the distance is all told, and it is like a deceit of the eye, that when others come on they think themselves going back.
      - [Envy]

Men possessing minds which are morose, solemn, and inflexible enjoy generally a greater share of dignity than of happiness.
      - [Dignity]

Men seem neither to understand their riches nor their strength; of the former they believe greater things than they should; of the latter much less. Self-reliance and self-denial will teach a man to drink out of his own cistern, and eat his own sweet bread, and to learn and labor truly to get his living, and carefully to expend the good things committed to his trust.
      - [Self-reliance]

Men suppose their reason has command over their words; still it happens that words in return exercise authority on reason.
      - [Words]

Men's thoughts are much according to their inclination.
      - [Wishes]

Merit and good works is the end of man's motion, and conscience of the same is the accomplishment of man's rest.
      - [Conscience]

Money is a good servant but a bad master.
  [Fr., L'argent est un bon serviteur, mais un mechant maitre."
      - quoted by,
        (French proverb), in "Menegiana", II, 296 (1695)
        [Money]

Mr. Bettenham said that virtuous men were like some herbs and spices, that give not out their sweet smell till they be broken or crushed.
      - [Adversity]

My name and memory I leave to men's charitable speeches, to foreign nations, and to the next are.
      - [Names]

Natural abilities are like natural plants; they need pruning by study.
      - [Ability]

Nature is often hidden, sometimes overcome, seldom extinguished.
      - [Nature]

Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed.
      - [Nature]

Natures that have much heat, and great and violent desires and perturbations, are not ripe for action till they have passed the meridian of their years.
      - [Age]

Neither the naked hand nor the understanding, left to itself, can do much; the work is accomplished by instruments and helps, of which the need is not less for the understanding than the hand.
      - [Hand]


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