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4TH EARL OF CHESTERFIELD, PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE
English courtier, statesman, wit and letter writer
(1694 - 1773)
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A cheerful, easy, open countenance will make fools think you a good-natured man, and make designing men think you an undesigning one.
      - [Cheerfulness]

A gentleman has ease without familiarity, is respectful without meanness; genteel without affectation, insinuating without seeming art.
      - [Gentlemen : Manners]

A joker is near akin to a buffoon; and neither of them is the least related to wit.
      - [Jesting]

A light supper, a good night's sleep, and a fine morning have often made a hero of the same man who, by indigestion, a restless night, and a rainy morning, would have proved a coward.
      - [Heroism]

A man who owes a little can clear it off in a very little time, and, if he is a prudent man, will; whereas a man, who by long negligence, owes a great deal, despairs of ever being able to pay, and therefore never looks into his accounts at all.
      - [Debt]

A man's fortune is frequently decided by his first address. If pleasing, others at once conclude he has merit; but if ungraceful, they decide against him.
      - [Manners]

A man's good-breeding is the best security against another's bad manners.
      - [Good Breeding]

A man's own good breeding is the best security against other people's ill manners.
      - [Manners]

A man's penmanship is an unfailing index of his character, moral and mental, and a criterion by which to judge his peculiarities of taste and sentiments.
      - in "Letters to His Son by the Earl of Chesterfield on the Fine Art of Becoming a Man of the World"
        [Penmanship]

A proper secrecy is the only mystery of able men; mystery is the only secrecy of weak and cunning ones.
      - [Mystery]

A vulgar man is captious and jealous; eager and impetuous about trifles. He suspects himself to be slighted, and thinks everything that is said meant at him.
      - [Coxcomb]

A weak mind is like a microscope, which magnifies trifling things, but cannot receive great ones.
      - [Mind]

Advice is seldom welcome; and those who want it the most always like it the least.
      - [Advice]

Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable; however, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose laziness and despondency make them give it up as unattainable.
      - [Perfection]

An able man shows his spirit by gentle words and resolute actions.
      - [Ability]

Anything that is worth doing at all is worth doing well.
      - [Doing]

Assurance and intrepidity, under the white banner of seeming modesty, clear the way to merit that would otherwise be discouraged by difficulties.
      - [Assurance]

Awkwardness is a more real disadvantage than it is generally thought to be; it often occasions ridicule, it always lessens dignity.
      - [Awkwardness]

Be wiser than other people if you can, but do not tell them so.
      - [Wisdom]

Be your character what it will, it will be known; and nobody will take it upon your word.
      - [Egotism]

Cautiously avoid talking of the domestic affairs either of yourself or of other people. Yours are nothing to them but tedious gossip, theirs are nothing to you.
      - [Talking]

Ceremonies are the outworks of manners.
      - [Ceremony]

Character must be kept bright as well as clean.
      - [Character]

Choose the company of your superiors whenever you can have it.
      - [Associates]

Compliments of congratulation are always kindly taken, and cost nothing but pen, ink and paper. I consider them as draughts upon good breeding, where the exchange is always greatly in favor of the drawer.
      - [Compliments]


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