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CICERO (MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO) (OFTEN CALLED "TULLY" FOR SHORT)
Roman philosopher, statesman and orator
(106 BC - 43 BC)
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That which leads us to the performance of duty by offering pleasure as its reward, is not virtue, but a deceptive copy and imitation of virtue.
  [Lat., Nam quae voluptate, quasi mercede aliqua, ad officium impellitur, ea non est virtus sed fallax imitatio simulatioque virtutis.]
      - Academici (IV, 46) [Virtue]

Nothing dries sooner than a tear.
  [Lat., Nihil enim lacryma citius arescit.]
      - Ad Herrenium (II, 31, 50) [Tears]

Honor is the reward of virtue.
  [Lat., Honor est premium virtutis.]
      - Brutus (LXXXI) [Virtue]

Like, according to the old proverb, naturally goes with like.
  [Lat., Pares autem vetere proverbio, cum paribus facillime congregantur.]
      - Cato Major De Senectute (III, 7)
        [Companionship]

As I approve of a youth that has something of the old man in him, so I am no less pleased with an old man that has something of the youth. He that follows this rule may be old in body, but can never be so in mind.
      - Cato; or, An Essay on Old Age [Youth]

Trust no one unless you have eaten much salt with him.
  [Lat., Nemini fidas, nisi cum quo prius multos modios salis absumpseris.]
      - De Amicitia (19, 67) [Eating]

Friendship makes prosperity brighter, while it lightens adversity by sharing its griefs and anxieties.
  [Lat., Secundas res splendidiores facit amicitia, et adversas partiens communicansque leviores.]
      - De Amicitia (VI) [Friendship]

This is a proof of a well-trained mind, to rejoice in what is good and to grieve at the opposite.
  [Lat., Ergo hoc proprium est animi bene constituti, et laetari bonis rebus, et dolere contrariis.]
      - De Amicitia (XIII) [Goodness]

It is a common saying that many pecks of salt must be eaten before the duties of friendship can be discharged.
  [Lat., Vulgo dicitur multos modios salis simul edendos esse, ut amicitia munus expletum sit.]
      - De Amicitia (XIX) [Friendship]

He takes the greatest ornament from friendship, who takes modesty from it.
  [Lat., Maximum ornamentum amicitiae tollit, qui ex ea tollit verecudiam.]
      - De Amicitia (XX) [Modesty]

A friend is, as it were, a second self.
  [Lat., Amicus est tanquam alter idem.]
      - De Amicitia (XXI, 80 (adapted)) [Friends]

Let flattery, the handmaid of the vices, be far removed (from friendship).
  [Lat., Assentatio, vitiorum adjutrix, procul amoveatur.]
      - De Amicitia (XXIV) [Flattery]

Fewer possess virtue, than those who wish us to believe that they possess it.
  [Lat., Virtute enim ipsa non tam multi praediti esse, quam videri volunt.]
      - De Amicitia (XXVI) [Virtue]

Certain signs precede certain events.
  [Lat., Certis rebus certa signa praecurrunt.]
      - De Divinatione (I, 52) [Future]

No one sees what is before his feet: we all gaze at the stars.
  [Lat., Quod est ante pedes nemo spectat: coeli scrutantur plagas.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 13) [Stars]

What greater or better gift can we offer the republic than to teach and instruct our youth?
  [Lat., Quod enim munus reiplicae afferre majus, meliusve possumus, quam si docemus atque erudimus juventutem?]
      - De Divinatione (II, 2) [Education]

A man does not wonder at what he sees frequently, even though he be ignorant of the reason. If anything happens which he has not seen before, he calls it a prodigy.
  [Lat., Quod crebo videt non miratur, etiamsi cur fiat nescit. Quod ante non vidit, id si evenerit, ostentum esse censet.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 22) [Familiarity]

In extraordinary events ignorance of their causes produces astonishment.
  [Lat., Causarum ignoratio in re nova mirationem facit.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 22) [Ignorance]

There is nothing which God cannot do.
  [Lat., Nihil est quod deus efficere non possit.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 41) [God]

I shall always consider the best guesser the best prophet.
  [Lat., Bene qui conjiciet, vatem hunc perhibebo optimum.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 5), Greek adage
        [Prophecy (Prophesy)]

A liar is not believed even though he tell the truth.
  [Lat., Mendaci homini ne verum quidem dicenti credere solemus.]
      - De Divinatione (II, 71) [Lying]

Religion is not removed by removing superstition.
  [Sp., Superstitione tollenda religio non tollitur.]
      - De Divinatone (II, 72) [Superstition]

You must therefore love me, myself, and not my circumstances, if we are to be real friends.
      - De Finibus, (Yonge's translation)
        [Friends]

His deeds do not agree with his words.
  [Lat., Facta ejus cum dictis discrepant.]
      - De Finibus (bk. II, 30) [Deeds]

The memory of past troubles is pleasant.
  [Lat., Jucunda memoria est praeteritorum malorum.]
      - De Finibus (bk. II, 32) [Trouble]


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