GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


CHARLES CALEB COLTON
English sportsman and writer
(1780 - 1832)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 21 of 23    Next Page >> 

Vivacity in youth !s often mistaken for genius, and solidity for dulness.
      - [Vivacity]

War kills men, and men deplore the lose; but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves societies.
      - [War]

Wars are to the body politic, what drams are to the individual. There are times when they may prevent a sudden death, but if frequently resorted to, or long persisted in, they heighten the energies only to hasten the dissolution.
      - [War]

We are more inclined to hate one another for points on which we differ, than to love one another for points on which we agree. The reason perhaps is this: when we find others that agree with us, we seldom trouble ourselves to confirm that agreement; but when we chance on those who differ from us, we are zealous both to convince and to convert them. Our pride is hurt by the failure, and disappointed pride engenders hatred.
      - [Controversy]

We are ruined, not by what we really want, but by what we think we do; therefore never go abroad in search of your wants; if they be real wants, they will come home in search of you; for he that buys what he does not want, will soon want what he cannot buy.
      - [Want]

We are sure to be losers when we quarrel with ourselves; it is a civil war, and in all such contentions, triumphs are defeats.
      - [Quarrels]

We ask advice, but we mean approbation.
      - [Advice]

We cannot think too highly of our nature, nor too humbly of ourselves. When we see the martyr to virtue, subject as he is to the infirmities of a man, yet suffering the tortures of a demon, and bearing them with the magnanimity of a God, do we not behold a heroism that angels may indeed surpass, but which they cannot imitate, and must admire.
      - [Heroism : Humility]

We devote the activity of our youth to revelry and the decrepitude of our old age to repentance: and we finish the farce by bequeathing our dead bodies to the chancel, which when living, we interdicted from the church.
      - [Compensation]

We hate some persons because we do not know them; and we will not know them because we hate them.
      - [Hatred]

We injure mysteries, which are matters of faith, by any attempt at explanation in order to make them matters of reason. Could they be explained, they would cease to be mysteries; and it has been well said that a thing is not necessarily against reason because it happens to be above it.
      - [Mystery]

We know the effects of many things, but the cause of few; experience, therefore, is a surer guide than imagination, and inquiry than conjecture.
      - [Cause]

We may anticipate bliss, but who ever drank of that enchanted cup unalloved?
      - [Bliss]

We must be careful how we flatter fools too little, or wise men too much; for the flatterer must act the very reverse of the physician, and administer the strongest dose only to the weakest patient.
      - [Flattery]

We must suit the flattery to the mind and taste of the recipient. We do not put essences into hogsheads, nor porter into phials. Delicate minds may be disgusted by compliments that would please a grosser intellect; as some fine ladies who would be shocked at the idea of a dram will not refuse a liqueur.
      - [Flattery]

We often pretend to fear what we really despise, and more often to despise what we really fear.
      - [Fear]

We often regret we did not do otherwise, when that very otherwise would, in all probability, have done for us.
      - [Regret]

We shall at all times chance upon men of recondite acquirements, but whose qualifications, from the incommunicative and inactive habits of their owners, are as utterly useless to others as though the possessors had them not.
      - [Acquirement]

We should act with as much energy as those who expect everything from themselves; and we should pray with as much earnestness as those who expect everything from God.
      - [Energy : Faith]

We should have a glorious conflagration if all who cannot put fire into their works would only consent to put their works into the fire.
      - [Books]

We should have all our communications with men, as in the presence of God; and with God, as in the presence of men.
      - [Conscience]

We should not be too niggardly in our praise, for men will do more to support a character than to raise one.
      - [Praise]

We should pray with as much earnestness as those who expect everything from God; we should act with as much energy as those who expect everything from themselves.
      - [Prayer]

We strive as hard to hide our hearts from ourselves as from others, and always with more success; for in deciding upon our own case we are both judge, jury, and executioner, and where sophistry cannot overcome the first, or flattery the second, self-love is always ready to defeat the sentence by bribing the third.
      - [Demagogue]

We submit to the society of those that can inform us, but we seek the society of those whom we can inform. And men of genius ought not to be chagrined if they see themselves neglected. For when we communicate knowledge, we are raised in our own estimation; but when we receive it, we are lowered.
      - [Society]


Displaying page 21 of 23 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books