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CHARLES DICKENS
English novelist
(1812 - 1870)
  CHECK READING LIST (15)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 7 of 8    Next Page >> 

"When a man says he's willin'," said Mr. Barkis, "it's as much as to say, that man's a-waitin' for a answer."
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. VIII) [Will]

I have known him [Micawber] come home to supper with a flood of tears, and a declaration that nothing was now left but a jail; and go to bed making a calculation of the expense of putting bow-windows to the house, "in case anything turned up," which was his favorite expression.
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. XI) [Expectation]

I never will desert Mr. Micawber.
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. XII) [Fidelity]

"It was as true," said Mr. Barkis, . . . "as taxes is. And nothing's truer than them."
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. XXI) [Truth]

Accidents will occur in the best regulated families.
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. XXVIII) [Accident]

"People can't die, along the coast," said Mr. Peggotty, "except when the tide's pretty nigh out. They can't be born, unless it's pretty nigh in--not properly born, till flood. He's a-going out with the tide."
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (ch. XXX) [Death]

I am well aware that I am the 'umblest person going . . . let the other be where he may.
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (vol. I, ch. XVII) [Humility]

'Umble we are, 'umble we have been, 'umble we shall ever be.
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (vol. I, ch. XVII) [Humility]

Mrs. Crupp had indignantly assured him that there wasn't room to swing a cat there; but as Mr. Dick justly observed to me, sitting down on the foot of the bed, nursing his leg, "You know, Trotwood, I don't want to swing a cat. I never do swing a cat. Therefore what does that signify to me?"
      - The Personal History of David Copperfield
         (vol. II, ch. VI) [Cats]

The first ray of light which illumines the gloom, and converts into a dazzling brilliancy that obscurity in which the earlier history of the public career of the immortal Pickwick would appear to be involved, is derived from the perusal of the following entry in the Transactions of the Pickwick Club, which the editor of these papers feels the highest pleasure in laying before his readers, as a proof of the careful attention, indefatigable assiduity, and nice discrimination, with which his search among the multifarious documents confided to him has been conducted.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
        [Books (First Lines)]

He had used the word in its Pickwickian sense . . . he had merely considered him a humbug in a Pickwickian point of view.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. I) [Sense]

"Never see . . . a dead post-boy, did you?" inquired Sam. . . . "No," rejoined Bob, "I never did." "No!" rejoined Sam triumphantly. "Nor never vill; and there's another thing that no man never see, and that's a dead donkey."
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. LI) [Wonder]

Oh, a dainty plant is the ivy green,
  That creepeth o'er ruins old!
    Of right choice food are his meals I ween,
      In his cell so lone and cold.
        . . . .
          Creeping where no life is seen,
            A rare old plant is the ivy green.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. VI) [Ivy]

"It wasn't the wine," murmured Mr. Snodgrass in a broken voice, "it was the salmon."
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. VIII) [Wine and Spirits]

"And a bird-cage, sir," said Sam. "Veels vithin veels, a prison in a prison."
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XL) [Prison]

They don't mind it: its a reg'lar holiday to them--all porter and skittles.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XL), of original edition [Life]

The key of the fields (street).
  [Fr., La clef des champs.]
      - used by
        The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XLVII) [Public]

The next time you go out to a smoking party, young feller, fill your pipe with that 'ere reflection.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XVI) [Reflection]

The wictim o' connubiality.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XX) [Matrimony]

Called me wessel, Sammy--a wessel of wrath.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXII) [Names]

It's a wery remarkable circumstance, sir," said Sam, "that poverty and oysters always seem to go together."
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXII) [Oysters]

"Wery good power o' suction, Sammy," said Mr. Weller the elder. . . . "You'd ha' made an uncommon fine oyster, Sammy, if you'd been born in that station o' life."
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXIII) [Drinking]

"Chops and Tomata Sauce. Yours, Pickwick." Chops! Gracious heavens! and Tomata Sauce! Gentlemen, is the happiness of a sensitive and confiding female to trifle away by such shallow artifices as these?
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXXIV) [Wooing]

I know'd what 'ud come o' this here mode o' doin' bisiness. Oh, Sammy, Sammy, vy worn't there a alleybi!
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXXIV (vol. II, ch. VI)) [Law]

If it's near dinner-time, the foreman takes out his watch when the jury has retired, and says: "Dear me, gentlemen, ten minutes to five, I declare! I dine at five, gentlemen." "So do I," says everybody else, except two men who ought to have dined at three and seem more than half disposed to stand out in consequence. The foreman smiles, and puts up his watch:--"Well, gentlemen, what do we say, plaintiff or defendant, gentlemen? I rather think, so far as I am concerned, gentlemen--I say I rather think--don't let that influence you--I rather think the plaintiff's the man." Upon this two or three other men are sure that think so too--as of course they do; and then they get on very unanimously and comfortably.
      - The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club
         (ch. XXXIV (vol. II, ch. VI)) [Law]


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