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OLIVER GOLDSMITH
Irish poet, dramatist and novelist
(1728 - 1774)
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What we say of a thing that has just come in fashion
  And that which we do with the dead,
    Is the name of the honestest man in the nation:
      What more of a man can be said?
      - punning epitaph on John Newbery, the publisher
        [Epitaphs]

Whatever be the motives which induce men to write,--whether avarice or fame,--the country becomes more wise and happy in which they most serve for instructors.
      - [Authorship]

Whatever mitigates the woes or increases the happiness of others is a just criterion of goodness; and whatever injures society at large, or any individual in it, is a criterion of iniquity. One should not quarrel with a dog without a reason sufficient to vindicate one through all the courts of morality.
      - [Goodness]

Whatever the skill of any country be in sciences, it is from excellence in polite learning alone that it must expect a character from posterity.
      - [Literature]

Where smiling Spring its earliest visit paid.
      - [Spring]

Whichever way we look the prospect is disagreeable. Behind, we have left pleasures we shall never enjoy, and therefore regret; and before, we see pleasures which we languish to possess, and are consequently uneasy till we possess them.
      - [Anticipation]

While fashion's brightest arts decoy, the heart, distrusting, asks if this be joy.
      - [Fashion]

While selfishness joins hands with no one of the virtues, benevolence is allied to them all.
      - [Benevolence]

Winter, lingering, chills the lap of May.
      - [Spring]

Wit generally succeeds more from being happily addressed than from its native poignancy. A jest, calculated to spread at a gaming-table, may be received with, perfect indifference should it happen to drop in a mackerel-boat.
      - [Wit]

You can preach a better sermon with your life than with your lips.
      - [Preaching]

Heroes themselves had fallen behind!
  --Whene'er he went before.
      - A Great Man [Admiration]

A night-cap deck'd his brows instead of bay,
  A cap by night,--a stocking all the day.
      - Description of an Author's Bedchamber,
        in "Citizen of the World", Letter 30, "The Author's Club"
        [Apparel]

That dire disease, whose ruthless power
  Withers the beauty's transient flower.
      - Double Transformation (l. 75) [Disease]

And what is friendship but a name,
  A charm that lulls to sleep;
    A shade that follows wealth or fame,
      And leaves the wretch to weep?
      - Edwin and Angelina, or The Hermit (st. 19)
        [Friendship]

The king himself has follow'd her
  When she has walk'd before.
      - Elegy on Mrs. Mary Blaise [Admiration]

Good people all, with one accord,
  Lament for Madame Blaize,
    Who never wanted a good word--
      From those who spoke her praise.
      - Elegy on Mrs. Mary Blaize [Praise]

A kind and gentle heart he had,
  To comfort friends and foes;
    The naked every day he clad
      When he put on his clothes.
      - Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog
        [Philanthropy]

And in that town a dog was found,
  As many dogs there be,
    Both mongrel, puppy, whelp and hound,
      And curs of low degree.
      - Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog [Dogs]

The man recover'd of the bite,
  The dog it was that died.
      - Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog [Poison]

Thus 'tis with all; their chief and constant care
  Is to seem everything but what they are.
      - Epilogue to The Sisters (l. 25)
        [Hypocrisy]

I hate the French because they are all slaves and wear wooden shoes.
      - Essays (24 (1765 ed.)),
        appeared in the "British Magazine", June, 1760
        [France]

Measures, not men, have always been my mark.
      - Good-Natured Man (act II) [Politics]

Such dainties to them, their health it might hurt:
  It's like sending them ruffles, when wanting a shirt.
      - Haunch of Venison [Luxury]

Taught by that Power that pities me,
  I learn to pity them.
      - Hermit (st. 6) [Pity]


Displaying page 7 of 13 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11 12 13

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