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DAVID HUME
Scottish philosopher and historian
(1711 - 1776)
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A delicacy of taste is favorable to love and friendship, by confining our choice to few people, and making us indifferent to the company and conversation of the greater part of men.
      - [Taste]

A propensity to hope and joy is real riches; one to fear and sorrow, real poverty.
      - [Hope]

A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence.
      - [Belief]

Accurate and just reasoning is the only catholic remedy, fitted for all persons and all dispositions; and is alone able to subvert that abstruse philosophy and metaphysical jargon, which, being mixed up with popular superstition, renders it in a manner impenetrable to careless reasoners, and gives it the air of science and wisdom.
      - [Reason]

All ills spring from some vice, either in ourselves or others; and even many of our diseases proceed from the same origin. Remove the vices; and the ills follow. You must only take care to remove all the vices. If you remove part, you may render the matter worse. By banishing vicious luxury, without curing sloth and an indifference to others, you only diminish industry in the state, and add nothing to men's charity or their generosity.
      - [Ills]

All power, even the most despotic, rests ultimately on opinion.
      - [Opinion]

All sentiment is sight; because sentiment has a reference to nothing beyond itself, and is always real wherever a man is conscious of it. But all determinations of the understanding are not right.
      - [Sentiment]

All that belongs to human understanding, in this deep ignorance and obscurity, is to be skeptical, or at least cautious; and not to admit of any hypothesis, whatsoever; much less, of any which is supported by no appearance of probability.
      - [Skepticism]

Almost every one has a predominant inclination, to which his other desires and affections submit, and which governs him, though perhaps with some intervals, though the whole course of his life.
      - [Inclination]

Among the arts of conversation no one pleases more than mutual deference or civility, which leads us to resign our own inclinations to those of our companions, and to curb and conceal that presumption and arrogance so natural to the human mind.
      - [Conversation]

Among well-bred people a mutual deference is affected, contempt of others is disguised; authority concealed; attention given to each in his turn; and an easy stream of conversation maintained without vehemence, without interruption, without eagerness for victory, and without any airs of superiority.
      - [Politeness]

An established government has an infinite advantage, by that very circumstance of its being established--the bulk of mankind being governed by authority, not reason, and never attributing authority to anything that has not the recommendation of antiquity.
      - [Government]

Any person seasoned with a just sense of the imperfections of natural reason, will fly to revealed truth with the greatest avidity.
      - [Reason]

Art may make a suit of clothes; but nature must produce a man.
      - [Man]

Avarice, the spur of industry.
      - [Avarice]

Be a philosopher but, amid all your philosophy be still a man.
      - [Philosophy]

Curiosity, or the love of knowledge, has a very limited influence, and requires youth, leisure education, genius and example to make it govern any person.
      - [Curiosity]

Delicacy of taste has the same effect as delicacy of passion; it enlarges the sphere both of our happiness and our misery.
      - [Taste]

Eloquence, when in its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection.
      - [Eloquence]

Every movement of the theater by a skilful poet is communicated, as it were, by magic, to the spectators; who weep, tremble, resent, rejoice, and are inflamed with all the variety of passions which actuate the several personages of the drama.
      - [Drama]

Everything is sold to skill and labor; and where nature furnishes the materials, they are still rude and unfinished, till industry, ever active and intelligent, refines them from their brute state, and fits them for human use and convenience.
      - [Industry]

Fine writing, according to Mr. Addison, consists of sentiments which are natural without being obvious.
      - [Writing]

Friendship is a calm and sedate affection, conducted by reason and cemented by habit; springing from long acquaintance and mutual obligations, without jealousies or fears, and without those feverish fits of heat and cold, which cause such an agreeable torment in the amorous passion.
      - [Friendship]

Great pleasures are much less frequent than great pains.
      - [Pleasure]

Happy the man whom indulgent fortune allows to pay to virtue what he owes to nature, and to make a generous gift of what must otherwise be ravished from him by cruel necessity.
      - [Self-sacrifice]


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