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DAVID LLOYD GEORGE
British (Welsh parentage) statesman and prime minister
(1863 - 1945)

Don't be afraid to take a big step. You can't cross a chasm in two small jumps.
      - [Confidence]

God has chosen little nations as the vessels by which He carries His choicest wines to the lips of humanity to rejoice their hearts, to exalt their vision, to strengthen their faith, and if we had stood by when two little nations (Belgium and Serbia) were being crushed and broken by the brutal hands of barbarians, our shame would have rung down the everlasting ages.
      - in a speech at Queen's Hall [War]

I am the last man in the world to say that the succor which is given us from America is not in itself something to rejoice at greatly. But I also say that I can see more in the knowledge that America is going to win a right to be at the conference table when the terms of peace are discussed. . . . It would have been a tragedy for mankind if America had not been there, and there with all her influence and power.
      - in a speech at the Meeting of American Residents in London
        [World Peace]

Is it an offence, is it a mistake, is it a crime to take a hopeful view of the prospects of your own country? Why should it be? Why should patriotism and pessimism be identical? Hope is the mainspring of patriotism.
      - in the House of Commons [Patriotism]

Peace must be framed on so equitable a basis, that the nations would not wish to disturb it . . . so that the confidence of the German people shall be put in the equity of their cause and not in the might of their armies.
      - in a speech at Glasgow [Victory]

The Bolshevists would blow up the fabric with high explosive, with horror. Others would pull down with the crowbars and with cranks--especially with cranks. . . . Sweating, slums, the sense of semi-slavery in labour, must go. We must cultivate a sense of manhood by treating men as men.
      - in a speech, Dec. 6, 1919 [Reform]

The finest eloquence is that which gets things done: the worst is that which delays them.
      - at the Conference of Paris [Work]

The last 100,000,000 pounds will win.
      - when Chancellor of the Exchequer at beginning of World War I, see "Everybody's Magazine", Jan. 1918, p. 8
        [War]

The stern hand of Fate has scourged us to an elevation where we can see the everlasting things that matter for a nation--the great peaks we had forgotten, of Honour, Duty, Patriotism, and clad in glittering white, the pinnacles of Sacrifice, pointing like a rugged finger to Heaven. We shall descend into the valley again; but as long as the men and women of this generation last, they will carry in their hearts the image of these mighty peaks, whose foundations are not shaken, though Europe rock and sway in the convolutions of a great war.
      - in a speech at Queen's Hall [War]

This solemn moment of triumph, one of the greatest moments in the history of the world . . . this great hour which rings in a new era . . . and which is going to lift up humanity to a higher plane of existence for all the ages of the future.
      - in a speech at Guildhall after the signing of the Armistice, ending of World War I
        [Prophecy (Prophesy)]

Too late in moving here, too late in arriving there, too late in coming to this decision, too late in starting enterprises, too late in preparing. In this war the footsteps of the allied forces have been dogged by the mocking specter of Too Late! and unless we quicken our movements, damnation will fall on the sacred cause for which so much gallant blood has flowed.
      - in a speech in the House of Commons [War]

Unemployment, with its injustice for the man who seeks and thirsts for employment, who begs for labour and cannot get it, and who is punished for failure he is not responsible for by the starvation of his children--that torture is something that private enterprise ought to remedy for its own sake.
      - in a speech [Work]


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