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JOHN LOCKE (1)
English philosopher and philanthropist
(1632 - 1704)
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A little bitter mingled in our cup leaves no relish of the sweet.
      - [Grief]

A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.
      - [Happiness]

Affectation in any part of our carriage is lighting up a candle to see our defects, and never fails to make us taken notice of, either as wanting sense or sincerity.
      - [Affectation]

Affection endeavors to correct natural defects, and has always the laudable aim of pleasing, though it always misses it.
      - [Affectation]

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.
      - [Error]

All sects, as far as reason will help them, gladly use it; when it fails them, they cry out it is a matter of faith, and above reason.
      - [Faith]

All virtue lies in a power of denying our own desires where reason does not authorize them.
      - [Virtue]

All wealth is the product of labor.
      - [Wealth]

Anger is uneasiness or discomposure of the mind upon the receipt of any injury, with a present purpose of revenge.
      - [Anger]

As there is a partiality to opinions, which is apt to mislead the understanding, so there is also a partiality to studies, which is prejudicial to knowledge.
      - [Partiality]

As to cards and dice, I think the safest and best way is never to learn to play upon them, and so to be incapacitated for those dangerous temptations and encroaching wasters of time.
      - [Games]

Beauty or unbecomingness is of more force to draw or deter invitation than any discourses which can be made to them.
      - [Beauty]

Children generally hate to be idle; all the care then is that their busy humor should be constantly employed in something of use to them.
      - [Children]

Conscience is merely our own judgment of the moral rectitude or turpitude of our own actions.
      - [Conscience]

Curiosity in children Nature has provided to remove the ignorance they were born with.
      - [Curiosity]

Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company, and education must finish him.
      - [Education]

Error is none the better for being common, nor truth the worse for having lain neglected.
      - [Error]

Every one is forward to complain of the prejudices that mislead other men and parties, as if he were free, and had none of his own. This being objected on all sides, it is agreed that it is a fault and a hindrance to knowledge. What now is the cure? No other but this, that every man should let alone others' prejudices and examine his own.
      - [Prejudice]

Every sect, as far as reason will help them, gladly use it; when it fails them, they cry out it is a matter of faith, and above reason.
      - [Reason]

Experience: in that all our knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives itself. Our observation employed either about external or sensible objects or about the internal operations of our minds, perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the materials of thinking.
      - [Experience]

Fashion is, for the most part, nothing but the ostentation of riches.
      - [Fashion]

Figured and metaphorical expressions do well to illustrate more abstruse and unfamiliar ideas, which the mind is not yet thoroughly accustomed to.
      - [Metaphors]

Firmness or stiffness of the mind is not from adherence to truth, but submission to prejudice.
      - [Obstinacy]

Folly consists in the drawing of false conclusions from just principles, by which it is distinguished from madness, which draws just conclusions from false principles.
      - [Folly]

Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.
      - [Fortitude]


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