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PLINY THE ELDER (CAIUS PLINIUS SECUNDUS)
Roman naturalist
(23 - 79)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 3 of 3

It has passed into a proverb, that wisdom is overshadowed by wine.
  [Lat., In proverbium cessit, sapientiam vino adumbrari.]
      - Historia Naturalis (XXIII, 23, 1)
        [Wine and Spirits]

Shoemaker, stick to your last.
  [Lat., Ne supra crepidam judicaret.]
      - quoted by Historia Naturalis
         (XXXV, 10, 36) [Proverbs : Shoemaking]

With a grain of salt. [To accept a statement with doubt.]
  [Lat., Cum grano salis.]
      - Natural History
        [Proverbial Phrases : Prudence]

Attic wit.
  [Lat., Sal Atticum.]
      - Natural History (31, 7, 41) [Wit]

And that all seas are made calme and still with oile; and therefore the Divers under the water doe spirt and sprinkle it abroad with their mouthes because it dulceth and allaieth the unpleasant nature thereof, and carrieth a light with it.
      - Natural History (bk. II, ch. CIII),
        (Holland's translation) [Navigation]

To laugh, if but for an instant only, has never been granted to man before the fortieth day from his birth, and then it is looked upon as a miracle of precocity.
      - Natural History (bk. VII, ch. I),
        (Holland's translation) [Laughter]

All men carry about them that which is poyson to serpents: for if it be true that is reported, they will no better abide the touching with man's spittle than scalding water cast upon them: but if it happed to light within their chawes or mouth, especially if it come from a man that is fasting, it is present death.
      - Natural History (bk. VII, ch. II),
        (Holland's translation) [Poison]

The first (barbers) that entered Italy came out of Sicily and it was in the 454 yeare after the foundation of Rome. Brought in they were by P. Ticinius Mena as Verra doth report for before that time they never cut their hair. The first that was shaven every day was Scipio Africanus, and after cometh Augustus the Emperor who evermore used the razor.
      - Natural History (bk. VII, ch. LIX)
        [Barber]

Man alone at the very moment of this birth, cast naked upon the earth, does she abandon to cries and lamentations.
      - Natural History (bk. VII, sec. II) [Birth]

When a building is about to fall down all the mice desert it.
      - Natural History (bk. VIII, sec. CIII)
        [Mice]

The feasant hens of Colchis, which have two ears as it were consisting of feathers, which they will set up and lay down as they list.
      - Natural History (bk. X, ch. XLVIII),
        (Holland's translation) [Pheasants]

Their best and most wholesome feeding is upon one dish and no more and the same plaine and simple: for surely this hudling of many meats one upon another of divers tastes is pestiferous. But sundrie sauces are more dangerous than that.
      - Natural History (bk. XI, ch. LIII),
        (Holland's translation) [Eating]

It has become quite a common proverb that in wine there is truth.
      - Natural History (bk. XIV, sec. XIV)
        [Wine and Spirits]

As touching peaches in general, the very name in Latine whereby they are called Persica, doth evidently show that they were brought out of Persia first.
      - Natural History (bk. XV, ch. 13),
        (Holland's translation) [Peaches]

There is an herb named in Latine Convolvulus (i.e. with wind), growing among shrubs and bushes, with carrieth a flower not unlike to this Lilly, save that it yeeldeth no smell nor hath those chives within; for whitenesse they resemble one another very much, as if Nature in making this floure were a learning and trying her skill how to frame the Lilly indeed.
      - Natural History (bk. XXI, ch. X),
        (Holland's translation) [Convolvulus]

Why is it that we entertain the belief that for every purpose odd numbers are the most effectual?
      - Natural History (bk. XXVIII, ch. V)
        [Superstition]

Licking a cub into shape.
  [Lat., Lambendo paulatim figurant.]
      - Natural History (VIII, 36) [Education]


Displaying page 3 of 3 for this author:   << Prev  1 2 [3]

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