GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Biographical
Name List
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Varying Hare
Books
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
SubAnagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


CHARACTER
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 15 of 15
[ Also see Ability Ancestry Attitude Audacity Bravery Capacity Circumstance Class Cleverness Conscience Consistency Daring Decision Dignity Disposition Distinction Duty Eloquence Enthusiasm Environment Ethics Example Fame Faults Genius Goodness Honor Individuality Innocence Integrity Kindness Man Men Merit Modesty Morality Names Nature Nobility Obedience Perfection Personality Principles Quality Rashness Recklessness Reform Reformation Reputation Resolution Responsibility Sportsmanship Talent Temper Temperament Virtue Women Worth ]

We are not that we are, nor do we treat or esteem each other for such, but for that we are capable of being.
      - Henry David Thoreau

Just men, by whom impartial laws were given,
  And saints, who taught and led the way to heaven!
      - Thomas Tickell,
        On the Death of Mr. Addison (l. 41)

Nor e'er was to the bowers of bliss conveyed
  A fairer spirit, or more welcome shade.
      - Thomas Tickell,
        On the Death of Mr. Addison (l. 45)

It is amusing to detect character in the vocabulary of each person. The adjectives habitually used, like the inscriptions on a thermometer, indicate the temperament.
      - Henry Theodore Tuckerman

There are beauties of character which, like the night-blooming cereus, are closed against the glare and turbulence of every-day life, and bloom only in shade and solitude, and beneath the quiet stars.
      - Henry Theodore Tuckerman

None but himself can be his parallel.
  [Lat., Quantum instar in ipso est.]
      - Virgil or Vergil (Publius Virgilius Maro Vergil),
        referring to Caesar,
        (also found in "The Double Falsehood" by Lewis Theobald)

Learn now of the treachery of the Greeks, and from one example the character of the nation may be known.
  [Lat., Accipe nunc Danaum insidias, et crimine ab uno
    Disce omnes.]
      - Virgil or Vergil (Publius Virgilius Maro Vergil),
        The Aeneid (II, 65)

They attack this one man with their hate and their shower of weapons. But he is like some rock which stretches into the vast sea and which, exposed to the fury of the winds and beaten against by the waves, endures all the violence and threats of heaven and sea, himself standing unmoved.
  [Lat., Uni odiisque viro telisque frequentibus instant.
    Ille velut rupes vastum quae prodit in aequor,
      Obvia ventorum furiis, expostaque ponto,
        Vim cunctam atque minas perfert coelique marisque,
          Ipsa immota manens.]
      - Virgil or Vergil (Publius Virgilius Maro Vergil),
        The Aeneid (X, 692)

Character is what nature has engraven in us; can we then efface it?
      - Voltaire (Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire)

He (the Chevalier de Belle-Isle) was capable of imagining all, of arranging all, and of doing everything.
  [Fr., Il [le Chevalier de Belle-Isle] etait capable de tout imaginer, de tout arranger, et de tour faire.]
      - Voltaire (Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire),
        Siecle de Louis XV--Works (XXI)

Lord of the golden tongue and smiting eyes;
  Great out of season and untimely wise:
    A man whose virtue, genius, grandeur, worth,
      Wrought deadlier ill than ages can undo.
      - Sir William Watson (2),
        The Political Luminary

In common discourse we denominate persons and things according to the major part of their character; he is to be called a wise man who has but few follies.
      - Isaac Watts

Character is the spiritual body of the person, and represents the individualization of vital experience, the conversion of unconscious things into self-conscious men.
      - Edwin Percy Whipple

Grit is the grain of character. It may generally be described as heroism materialized,--spirit and will thrust into heart, brain, and backbone, so as to form part of the physical substance of the man.
      - Edwin Percy Whipple

I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
  And what I assume you shall assume,
    For every atom belonging to me as good as belongs to you.
      - Walt Whitman, Song of Myself (I)

Formed on the good old plan,
  A true and brave and downright honest man!
    He blew no trumpet in the market-place,
      Nor in the church with hypocritic face
        Supplied with cant the lack of Christian grace;
          Loathing pretence, he did with cheerful will
            What others talked of while their hands were still.
      - John Greenleaf Whittier, Daniel Neall (II)

Only the shallow know themselves.
      - Oscar Wilde (Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde)

Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.
      - John Wooden

These two things, contradictory as they may seem, must go together,--manly dependence and manly independence, manly reliance and manly self-reliance.
      - William Wordsworth

One that would peep and botanize
  Upon his mother's grave.
      - William Wordsworth, A Poet's Epitaph
         (st. 5)

But who, if he be called upon to face
  Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined
    Great issues, good or bad for humankind,
      Is happy as a lover.
      - William Wordsworth,
        Character of a Happy Warrior (l. 48)

Whom neither shape of danger can dismay,
  Nor thought of tender happiness betray.
      - William Wordsworth,
        Character of a Happy Warrior (l. 72)

The reason firm, the temperate will,
  Endurance, foresight, strength and skill.
      - William Wordsworth,
        She Was a Phantom of Delight

The man that makes a character, makes foes.
      - Edward Young, Epistles to Mr. Pope
         (ep. I, l. 28)

The man who consecrates his hours
  By vig'rous effort and an honest aim,
    At once he draws the sting of life and death;
      He walks with nature and her paths are peace.
      - Edward Young, Night Thoughts
         (night II, l. 187)


Displaying page 15 of 15 for this topic:   << Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15]

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2013 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2013 March 16
Click > HERE < to report errors

Buy a good book from
Varying Hare Books