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MERRIMENT
  Displaying page 1 of 2    Next Page >> 
[ Also see Cheerfulness Delight Enjoyment Folly Gaiety Happiness Humor Jesting Joy Laughter Mirth Pleasure Smiles Wit ]

An ounce of mirth is worth a pound of sorrow.
      - Richard Baxter, Self Denial

A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones.
      - Bible, Proverbs (ch. XVII, v. 22)

As Tammie glow'red, amazed and curious,
  The mirth and fun grew fast and furious.
      - Robert Burns, Tam o' Shanter

Go then merrily to Heaven.
      - Robert Burton, Anatomy of Melancholy
         (pt. II, sec. 3, memb. 1)

The more fools the more one laughs.
  [Fr., Plus on est de fous, plus on rit.]
      - Florent Carton Dancourt,
        Maison de Campagne (sc. 11)

Some credit in being jolly.
      - Charles Dickens,
        The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit
         (ch. V)

A very merry, dancing, drinking,
  Laughing, quaffing, and unthinking time.
      - John Dryden, The Secular Masque (l. 40)

And mo the merier is a Prouerbe eke.
  [The more the merrier.]
      - George Gascoigne, Works (I, 64),
        (edited by Hazlitt)

Nothing is more hopeless than a scheme of merriment.
      - Samuel Johnson (a/k/a Dr. Johnson) ("The Great Cham of Literature")

Be merry if you are wise.
  [Lat., Ride si sapis.]
      - Martial (Marcus Valerius Martialis),
        Epigrams (II, 41, 1)

Mirth, admit me of thy crew,
  To live with her, and live with thee,
    In unreprov'd pleasures free.
      - John Milton, L'Allegro (l. 38)

Forward and frolic glee was there,
  The will to do, the soul to dare.
      - Sir Walter Scott, The Lady of the Lake
         (canto I, st. 21)

And frame your mind to mirth and merrimnent,
  Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life.
      - William Shakespeare

As 'tis ever common
  That men are merriest when they are from home.
      - William Shakespeare

As merry as the day is long.
      - William Shakespeare

What should a man do but be merry? For look you how cheerfully my mother looks, and my father died within's two hours.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Hamlet Prince of Denmark
         (Hamlet at III, ii)

Hostess, clap to the doors. Watch to-night, pray to-morrow. Gallants, lads, boys, hearts of gold, all the titles of good fellowship come to you! What, shall we be merry? Shall we have a play extempore.
      - William Shakespeare,
        King Henry the Fourth, Part I
         (Falstaff at II, iv)

Berowne they call him; but a merrier man,
  Within the limit of becoming mirth,
    I never spent an hour's talk withal.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Rosaline at II, i)

To move wild laughter in the throat of death?
  It cannot be; it is impossible:
    Mirth cannot move a soul in agony.
      - William Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost
         (Berowne at V, ii)

Be large in mirth; anon we'll drink a measure
  The table round.
      - William Shakespeare, Macbeth
         (Macbeth at III, iv)

For the heavens, he shows me where the bachelors sit, and there live we as merry as the day is long.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Beatrice at II, i)

(Pedro:) In faith, lady, you have a merry heart.
  (Beatrice:) Yea, my lord; I thank it, poor fool, it keeps on the windy side of care.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Pedro & Beatrice at II, i)

(Pedro:) Your silence most offends me, and to be merry best becomes you for out o' question you were born in a merry hour.
  (Beatrice:) No, sure, my lord, my mother cried; but then there was a star danced, and under that was I born.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Much Ado About Nothing
         (Pedro & Beatrice at II, i)

I am not merry; but I do beguile
  The thing I am by seeming otherwise.
      - William Shakespeare,
        Othello the Moor of Venice
         (Desdemona at II, i)

And if you can be merry then, I'll say
  A man may weep upon his wedding day.
      - William Shakespeare,
        The Life of King Henry the Eighth
         (Speaker at prologue)


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