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ALEXANDER POPE
English poet and critic
(1688 - 1744)
  CHECK READING LIST (3)    << Prev Page    Displaying page 15 of 34    Next Page >> 

Ask you what provocation I have had?
  The strong antipathy of good to bad.
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue 2, l. 205)
        [Cause]

Virtue, I grant you, is an empty boast;
  But shall the dignity of vice be lost?
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue I) [Vice]

When truth or virtue an affront endures,
  Th' affront is mine, my friend, and should be yours.
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue I, l. 207)
        [Truth]

How, sir! not damn the sharper, but the dice?
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue II, l. 13)
        [Gambling]

Sure if they cannot cut, it may be said
  His saws are toothless, and his hatchets lead.
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue II, l. 151)
        [Carpentry]

And all your courtly civet cats can vent
  Perfume to you, to me is excrement.
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue II, l. 188)
        [Perfume]

And each blasphemer quite escape the rod,
  Because the insult's not on man, but God?
      - Epilogue to Satires (dialogue II, l. 199)
        [Swearing]

Virtue may choose the high or low degree,
  'Tis just alike to virtue, and to me;
    Dwell in a monk, or light upon a king,
      She's still the same belov'd, contented thing.
      - Epilogue to Satires (satire I, l. 137)
        [Virtue]

The gracious Dew of Pulpit Eloquence,
  And all the well-whip'd Cream of Courtly Sense.
      - Epilogue to Satires--Dialogue I (l. 70)
        [Preaching]

When the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.
      - Epistle I (bk. I, l. 38) [Youth]

E'en Sunday shines no Sabbath day to me.
      - Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot--Prologue to the Satires
         (l. 12) [Sabbath]

Obliged by hunger and request of friends.
      - Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot--Prologue to the Satires
         (l. 44) [Hunger]

Love, free as air, at sight of human ties,
  Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies.
      - Epistle to Eloisa (last line) [Love]

A minister, but still a man.
      - Epistle to James Craggs [Man]

She went from opera, park, assembly, play,
  To morning walks, and prayers three hours a day.
    To part her time 'twixt reading and bohea,
      To muse, and spill her solitary tea,
        Or o'er cold coffee trifle with the spoon,
          Count the slow clock, and dine exact at noon.
      - Epistle to Miss Blount on Leaving Town
         (l. 13) [Life]

Good-humor only teaches charms to last,
  Still makes new conquests and maintains the past.
      - Epistle to Miss Blount--With the Works of Voiture
        [Character]

A long, exact, and serious comedy;
  In every scene some moral let it teach,
    And, if it can, at once both please and preach.
      - Epistle to Miss Blount--With the Works of Voiture
         (l. 22) [Acting]

With sharpen'd sight pale Antiquaries pore,
  Th' inscription value, but the rust adore.
    This the blue varnish, that the green endears;
      The sacred rust of twice ten hundred years.
      - Epistle to Mr. Addison (l. 35) [Antiquity]

Divert her eyes with pictures in the fire.
      - Epistle to Mrs. Teresa Blount, on her leaving the Town after the Coronation
        [Fire]

Absent or dead, still let a friend be dear,
  (A sigh the absent claims, the dead a tear.)
      - Epistle to Robert, Earl of Oxford
        [Friends]

Get place and wealth, if possible, with grace;
  If not, by any means get wealth and place.
      - Epistles of Horace (ep. I, bk. I, l. 103)
        [Wealth]

He's armed without that's innocent within.
      - Epistles of Horace (ep. I, bk. I, l. 93)
        [Innocence]

The mob of gentlemen who wrote with ease.
      - Epistles of Horace (ep. I, bk. II, l. 108)
        [Journalism]

Above all Greek, above all Roman fame.
      - Epistles of Horace (ep. I, bk. II, l. 26)
        [Fame]

Under this marble, or under this sill,
  Or under this turf, or e'en what they will,
    Whatever an heir, or a friend in his stead,
      Or any good creature shall lay o'er my head,
        Lies one who ne'er car'd, and still cares not a pin
          What they said or may say of the mortal within;
            But who, living and dying, serene, still and free,
              Trusts in God that as well as he was he shall be.
      - Epitaph [Epitaphs]


Displaying page 15 of 34 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 [15] 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34

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