GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


EDMUND BURKE
Irish orator and statesman
(1729 - 1797)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 4 of 12    Next Page >> 

If you can be well without health, you may be happy without virtue.
      - [Virtue]

In a free country every man thinks he has a concern in all public matters,--that he has a right to form and a right to deliver an opinion on them. This it is that fills countries with men of ability in all stations.
      - [Freedom]

In all forms of government the people is the true legislator.
      - [Government]

Instead of casting away all our old prejudices, we cherish them to a very considerable degree, and, to take more shame to ourselves, we cherish them because they are prejudices; and the longer they have lasted and the more generally they have prevailed, the more we cherish them. We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations and of ages.
      - [Prejudice]

Is it in destroying and pulling down that skill is displayed? The shallowest understanding, the rudest hand, is more than equal to that task.
      - [Critics]

It becomes extremely hard to disentangle our idea of the cause from the effect by which we know it.
      - [Cause]

It is a general error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.
      - [Complaining]

It is by bribing, not so often by being bribed, that wicked politicians bring ruin on mankind. Avarice is a rival to the pursuits of many.
      - [Avarice]

It is by imitation, far more than by precept, that we learn everything; and what we learn thus, we acquire not only more effectually, but more pleasantly.
      - [Imitation]

It is by sympathy we enter into the concerns of others, that we are moved as they are moved, and are never suffered to be indifferent spectators of almost anything which men can do or suffer. For sympathy may be considered as a sort of substitution, by which we are put into the place of another man, and affected in many respects as he is affected.
      - [Sympathy]

It is for the most part in our skill in manners, and in the observations of time and place and of decency in general, that what is called taste by way of distinction consists; and which is in reality no other than a more refined judgment.
      - [Taste]

It is in the relaxation of security; it is in the expansion of prosperity; it is in the hour of dilatation of the heart, and of its softening into festivity and pleasure, that the real character of men is discerned.
      - [Character]

It is known that the taste--whatever it is--is improved exactly as we improve our judgment, by extending our knowledge, by a steady attention to our object, and by frequent exercise.
      - [Taste]

It is necessary only for the good man to do nothing for evil to triumph.
      - attributed to,
        but not found in his writings [Evil]

It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free; their passions forge their fetters.
      - [Mind]

It is the nature of tyranny and rapacity never to learn moderation from the ill-success of first oppressions; on the contrary, all oppressors, all men thinking highly of the methods dictated by their nature, attribute the frustration of their desires to the want of sufficient rigor.
      - [Tyranny]

It is undoubtedly true, though it may seem paradoxical,--but, in general, those who are habitually employed in finding and displaying faults are unqualified for the work of reformation.
      - [Censure]

It is very rare, indeed, for men to be wrong in their feelings concerning public misconduct; as rare to be right in their speculations upon the cause of it. I have constantly observed that the generality of people are fifty years, at least, behind in their politics.
      - [Politics]

Law and arbitrary power are at eternal enmity.
      - [Law : Power]

Laws are commanded to hold their tongues among arms; and tribunals fall to the ground with the peace they are no longer able to uphold.
      - [War]

Liberty must be limited in order to be possessed.
      - [Liberty]

Liberty, without wisdom, is license.
      - [Liberty]

Magnificence is likewise a source of the sublime. A great profusion of things which are splendid or valuable in themselves is magnificent. The starry heaven, though it occurs so very frequently to our view, never fails to excite an idea of grandeur.
      - [Stars]

Man acts from adequate motives relative to his interest, and not on metaphysical speculations.
      - [Motive]

Man is an animal that cooks his victuals.
      - [Man]


Displaying page 4 of 12 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2016 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2016 June 16
Click > HERE < to report errors