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H.G. WELLS (HERBERT GEORGE WELLS)
English novelist, historian and sociologist
(1866 - 1946)
  CHECK READING LIST (9)  

As long as there is a chance of the world getting through its troubles, I hold that a reasonable man must behave as though he were sure of it. If at the end your cheerfulness was not justified, at any rate you will have been cheerful.
      - [Cheerfulness]

Better it is toward the right conduct of life to consider what will be the end of a thing, than what is the beginning of it: for what promises fair at first may prove ill, and what seems at first a disadvantage, may prove very advantageous.
      - [Consideration]

Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.
      - [History]

Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.
      - [Indignation]

Patriotism has become a mere national self assertion, a sentimentality of flag-cheering with no constructive duties.
      - Future in America [Patriotism]

I saw a gray-haired man a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing.
      - In the Days of the Comet
        [Books (First Lines)]

It was the sixth day of Mr. Direck's first visit to England, and he was at his acutest perception of differences. He found England in every way gratifying and satisfactory, and more of a contrast with things American than he had ever dared to hope.
      - Mr. Britling Sees It Through
        [Books (First Lines)]

If we suppose a sufficient righteousness and intelligence in men to produce presently, from the tremendous lessons of history, an effective will for a world peace--that is to say, an effective will for a world law under a world government--for in no other fashion is a secure world peace conceivable--in what manner may we expect things to move towards this end? . . . It is an educational task, and its very essence is to bring to the minds of all men everywhere, as a necessary basis for world cooperation, a new telling and interpretation, a common interpretation, of history.
      - Outline of History (ch. XLI, par. 2)
        [World Peace]

There will be little drudgery in this better ordered world. Natural power harnessed in machines will be the general drudge. What drudgery is inevitable will be done as a service and duty for a few years or months out of each life; it will not consume nor degrade the whole life of anyone.
      - Outline of History (ch. XLI, par. 4)
        [Work]

As I sit down to write here amidst the shadows of vine-leaves under the blue sky of southern Italy it comes to me with a certain quality of astonishment that my participation in these amazing adventures of Mr. Cavor was, after all, the outcome of the purest accident.
      - The First Men in the Moon
        [Books (First Lines)]

In the middle years of the nineteenth century there first became abundant in this strange world of ours a class of men, men tending for the most part to become elderly, who are called, and who are very properly called, but who dislike extremely to be called--"Scientists."
      - The Food of the Gods [Books (First Lines)]

The stranger came early in February one wintry day, through a biting wind and a driving snow, the last snowfall of the year, over the down, walking as it seemed from Bramblehurst railway station and carrying a little black portmanteau in his thickly gloved hand.
      - The Invisible Man [Books (First Lines)]

The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us.
      - The Time Machine [Books (First Lines)]

No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinized and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.
      - The War of the Worlds
        [Books (First Lines)]


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