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HOMER ("SMYRNS OF CHIOS")
Greek poet
(fl. 750 BC or earlier)
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It is not strength, but art, obtains the prize,
  And to be swift is less than to be wise.
    'Tis more by art, than force of numerous strokes.
      - The Iliad (bk. 23, l. 382),
        (Pope's translation) [Art]

Two urns by Jove's high throne have ever stood,
  The source of evil one, and one of good.
      - The Iliad (bk. 24, l.663),
        (Pope's translation) [Creation]

Lay ye down the golden chain
  From Heaven, and pull at its inferior links
    Both Goddesses and Gods.
      - The Iliad (bk. 8), (Cowley's translation)
        [Influence]

His speech flowed from his tongue sweeter than honey.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, 124) [Speech]

Prophet of evil! never hadst thou yet
  A cheerful word for me. To mark the signs
    Of coming mischief is thy great delight,
      Good dost thou ne'er foretell nor bring to pass.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 138),
        (Bryant's translation)
        [Prophecy (Prophesy)]

Who hearkens to the gods, the gods give ear.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 280),
        (Bryant's translation) [Gods]

Words sweet as honey from his lips distill'd.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 332),
        (Pope's translation) [Words]

The son of Saturn gave
  The nod with his dark brows. The ambrosial curls
    Upon the Sovereign One's immortal head
      Were shaken, and with them the mighty mount,
        Olympus trembled.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 666),
        (Bryant's translation) [Gods]

Shakes his ambrosial curls, and gives the nod,
  The stamp of fate, and sanction of the god.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 684),
        (Pope's translation) [Gods]

And unextinguish'd laughter shakes the skies.
      - The Iliad (bk. I, l. 771),
        (Pope's translation) [Laughter]

The rule
  Of the many is not well. One must be chief
    In war and one the king.
      - The Iliad (bk. II, l. 253),
        (Bryant's translation) [Royalty]

The ox-eyes awful Juno.
      - The Iliad (bk. III, l. 144) [Gods]

Chiefs who no more in bloody fights engage,
  But, wise through time, and narrative with age,
    In summer-days like grasshoppers rejoice,
      A bloodless race, that send a feeble voice.
      - The Iliad (bk. III, l. 199),
        (Pope's translation) [Wisdom]

She moves a goddess, and she looks a queen.
      - The Iliad (bk. III, l. 208),
        (Pope's translation) [Women]

Ajax the great . . .
  Himself a host.
      - The Iliad (bk. III, l. 293),
        (Pope's translation) [Greatness]

Having well polished the whole bow, he added a golden tip.
      - The Iliad (bk. IV, III) [End]

Of the loud resounding sea.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, 182) [Ocean]

Thou wilt lament
  Hereafter, when the evil shall be done
    And shall admit no cure.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 308),
        (Bryant's translation) [Regret]

But curb thou the high spirit in thy breast,
  For gentle ways are best, and keep aloof
    From sharp contentions.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 317),
        (Bryant's translation) [Contention]

Hateful to me as are the gates of hell,
  Is he who, hiding one thing in his heart,
    Utters another.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 386),
        (Bryant's translation) [Deceit]

And they die
  An equal death,--the idler and the man
    Of mighty deeds.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 396),
        (Bryant's translation) [Death]

Who dares think one thing, and another tell,
  My heart detests him as the gates of hell.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 412),
        (Pope's translation) [Lying]

Life is not to be bought with heaps of gold;
  Not all Apollo's Pythian treasures hold,
    Or Troy once held, in peace and pride sway,
      Can bribe the poor possession of the day.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 524),
        (Pope's translation) [Life]

Short is my date, but deathless my renown.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 535),
        (Pope's translation) [Fame]

But strong of limb
  And swift of foot misfortune is, and, far
    Outstripping all, comes to every land,
      And there wreaks evil on mankind, which prayers
        Do afterwards redress.
      - The Iliad (bk. IX, l. 625),
        (Bryant's translation) [Misfortune]


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