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JANE AUSTEN
English novelist (signed first book "By a Lady")
(1775 - 1817)
  CHECK READING LIST (7)  

Single Women have a dreadful propensity to being poor--which is one very strong argument in favor of Matrimony.
      - in an 1817 letter to her niece, Fanny Knight
        [Matrimony : Poverty]

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
      - Emma [Books (First Lines)]

Why not seize the pleasure at once--How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!.
      - Emma (vol. II, ch. XII) [Happiness]

Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.
      - Emma (vol. II, ch. XVI) [Business]

It is very difficult for the prosperous to be humble.
      - Emma (vol. III, ch. XIV) [Prosperity]

About thirty years ago, Miss Maria Ward of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income.
      - Mansfield Park [Books (First Lines)]

Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.
      - Mansfield Park (ch. XI) [Opinion]

A woman, especially if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
      - Northanger (ch. 14) [Knowledge]

No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine.
      - Northanger Abbey [Books (First Lines)]

Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch-hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who, for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Barontage; there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in a distressed one; . . .
      - Persuasion [Books (First Lines)]

She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older--the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
      - Persuasion (ch. 4) [Romance]

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
  However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.
      - Pride and Prejudice [Books (First Lines)]

With the Gardiners, they were always on the most intimate terms. Darcy, as well as Elizabeth, really loved them; and they were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the persons who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.
      - Pride and Prejudice [Books (Last Lines)]

One may be continually abusive without saying anything just; but one cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.
      - Pride and Prejudice (ch. 40) [Abuse]

In nine cases out of ten a women had better show more affection than she feels.
      - Pride and Prejudice (ch. 6) [Affection]

It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?
      - Pride and Prejudice (ch. XIV) [Pleasure]

A gentleman and a lady travelling from Tunbridge towards that part of the Sussex coast which lies between Hastings and Eastbourne, being induced by business to quit the high road and attempt a very rough land, were overturned in toiling up its long ascent, half rock, half sand.
      - Sanditon [Books (First Lines)]

Mrs. Dashwood was prudent enough to remain at the cottage, without attempting a removal to Delaford; and fortunately for Sir John and Mrs. Jennings, when Marianne was taken from them, Margaret had reached an age highly suitable for dancing, and not very ineligible for being supposed to have a lover. Between Barton and Delaford, there was that constant communication which strong family affection would naturally dictate;--and among the merits and the happiness of Elinor and Marianne, let it not be ranked as the least considerable, that though sisters, and living almost within sight of each other, they could live without disagreement between themselves, or producing coolness between their husbands.
      - Sense and Sensibility [Books (Last Lines)]

The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance. The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister.
      - Sense and Sensibility
        [Books (First Lines)]


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