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JEAN DE LA BRUYERE
French philosopher, moralist and writer
(1645 - 1696)
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They who, without any previous knowledge of us, think amiss of us, do us no harm; they attack not us, but the phantom of their own imagination.
      - [Prejudice]

Those who make the worst use of their time are the first to complain of its brevity.
      - [Time]

Those who, without knowing us, think or speak evil of us, do no harm; it is not us they attack, but the phantom of their own imagination.
      - [Slander]

To be deprived of the person we love is a happiness in comparison to living with one we hate.
      - [Hate]

To endeavor to forget anyone is a certain way of thinking of nothing else.
      - [Thinking]

To give awkwardly is churlishness. The most difficult part is to give, then why not add a smile?
      - [Generosity]

To what excesses do men rush for the sake of religion, of whose truth they are so little persuaded, and to whose precepts they pay so little regard!
      - [Religion]

Too great carelessness, equally with excess in dress, multiplies the wrinkles of old age, and makes its decay still more conspicuous.
      - [Dress]

Two persons will not be friends long if they cannot forgive each other little failings.
      - [Friends]

We all covet wealth, but not its perils.
      - [Wealth]

We are come too late, by several thousand years, to say anything new in morality. The finest and most beautiful thoughts concerning manners have been carried away before our times, and nothing is left for us but to glean after the ancients, and the most ingenious of the moderns.
      - [Morality]

We are more sociable, and get on better with people by the heart than the intellect.
      - [Sociability]

We meet With few utterly dull and stupid souls: the sublime and transcendent are still fewer; the generality of mankind stand between these two extremes: the interval is filled with multitudes of ordinary geniuses, but all very useful, and the ornaments and supports of the commonwealth.
      - [Mediocrity]

We must strive to make ourselves really worthy of some employment. We need pay no attention to anything else; the rest is the business of others.
      - [Occupations]

We never love heartily but once, and that is the first time we love.
      - [Love]

We rarely repent of speaking little, but often of speaking too much.
      - [Speech]

We seldom repent talking little, but very often talking too much.
      - [Talking]

We wish to constitute all the happiness, or, if that cannot be, the misery of the one we love.
      - [Selfishness]

What is certain in death is somewhat softened by what is uncertain; it is an indefiniteness in the time, which holds a certain relation to the infinite, and what is called eternity.
      - [Death]

When a book raises your spirit, and inspires you with noble and courageous feelings, seek for no other rule to judge the work by; it is good, and made by a good workman.
      - [Books]

When we are young we lay up for old age; when we are old we save for death.
      - [Prudence]

When we have run through all forms of government, without partiality to that we were born under, we are at a loss with which to side; they are all a compound of good and evil. It is therefore most reasonable and safe to value that of our own country above all others, and to submit to it.
      - [Government]

When what you read elevates your mind and fills you with noble aspirations, look for no other rule by which to judge a book; it is good, and is the work of a master-hand.
      - [Reading]

Where a book raises your spirit, and inspires you with noble and courageous feelings, seek for no other rule to judge the event by; it is good and made by a good workman.
      - [Books]

Widows, like ripe fruit, drop easily from their perch.
      - [Widows]


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