GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


JEREMY COLLIER
English bishop, theologian and Jacobite
(1650 - 1726)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 2 of 3    Next Page >> 

Hope is a vigorous principle; it is furnished with light and heat to advise and execute; it sets the head and heart to work, and animates a man to do his utmost. And thus, by perpetually pushing and assurance, it puts a difficulty out of countenance, and makes a seeming impossibility give way.
      - [Hope]

How are such an infinite number of things placed with such order in the memory, notwithstanding the tumult, marches, and counter-marches of the animal spirits?
      - [Memory]

How many feasible projects have miscarried through despondency, and been strangled in their birth by a cowardly imagination.
      - [Despondency]

I would not despair unless I knew the irrevocable decree was passed; saw my misfortune recorded in the book of fate, and signed and sealed by neces-sity.
      - [Despair]

Idleness is an inlet to disorder, and makes way for licentiousness. People that have nothing to do are quickly tired of their own company.
      - [Idleness]

Intemperance is a dangerous companion. It throws many people off their guard, betrays them to a great many indecencies, to ruinous passions, to disadvantages in fortune; makes them discover secrets, drive foolish bargains, engage in play, and often to stagger from the tavern to the stews.
      - [Drunkenness]

It is a difficult task to talk to the purpose, and to put life and perspicuity into our discourse.
      - [Talking]

It were well if there were fewer heroes; for I scarcely ever heard of any, excepting Hercules, but did more mischief than good. These overgrown mortals commonly use their will with their right hand; and their reason with their left.
      - [Heroes]

Learning gives us a fuller conviction of the imperfections of our nature; which one would think, might dispose us to modesty.
      - [Learning]

Not that the moderns are born with more wit than their predecessors, but, finding the world better furnished at their coming into it, they have more leisure for new thoughts, more light to direct them, and more hints to work upon.
      - [Culture]

Of all sorts of flattery, that which comes from a solemn character and stands before a sermon is the worst-complexioned. Such commendation is a satire upon the author, makes the text look mercenary, and disables the discourse from doing service.
      - [Preaching]

Passing too eagerly upon a provocation loses the guard and lays open the body; calmness and leisure and deliberation do the business much better.
      - [Retribution]

People's opinions of themselves are legible in their countenances.
      - [Physiognomy]

Perpetual pushing and assurance put a difficulty out of countenance, and make a seeming impossibility give way.
      - [Perseverance]

Prudence is a necessary ingredient in all the virtues, without which they degenerate into folly and excess.
      - [Prudence]

Remorse of conscience is like an old wound; a man is in no condition to fight under such circumstances. The pain abates his vigor and takes up too much of his attention.
      - [Conscience]

Rhetoric is nothing but reason well dressed and argument put in order.
      - [Rhetoric]

Self-conceit is a weighty quality, and will sometimes bring down the scale when there is nothing else in it. It magnifies a fault beyond proportion, and swells every omission into an outrage.
      - [Self-conceit]

Sloth is an inlet to disorder, and makes way for licentiousness. People that have nothing to do are quickly tired of their own company.
      - [Sloth]

Temperance keeps the senses clear and unembarrassed, and makes them seize the object with more keenness and satisfaction. It appears with life in the face, and decorum in the person; it gives you the command of your head, and secures your health, and preserves you in a condition for business.
      - [Temperance]

The end of pleasure is to support the offices of life, to relieve the fatigues of business, to reward a regular action, and to encourage the continuance.
      - [Pleasure]

The more we sink into the infirmities of age, the nearer we are to immortal youth. All people are young in the other world. That state is an eternal spring, ever fresh and flourishing. Now, to pass from midnight into noon on the sudden, to be decrepit one minute and all spirit and activity the next, must be a desirable change. To call this dying is an abuse of language.
      - [Death]

There are few things reason can discover with so much certainty and ease as its own insufficiency.
      - [Reason]

Those who despise fame seldom deserve it. We are apt to undervalue the purchase we cannot reach, to conceal our poverty the better. It is a spark which kindles upon the best fuel, and burns brightest in the bravest breast.
      - [Fame]

Thoughts take up no room. When they are right, they afford a portable pleasure, which one may travel with, without any trouble or encumbrance.
      - [Apothegms]


Displaying page 2 of 3 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 [2] 3

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2016 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2016 June 16
Click > HERE < to report errors