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NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
American novelist and short story writer
(1804 - 1864)
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Women are safer in perilous situations and emergencies than men, and might be still more so if they trusted themselves more confidingly to the chivalry of manhood.
      - [Trust]

A long time ago, in a town with which I used to be familiarly acquainted, there dwelt an elderly person of grim aspect, known by the name and title of Doctor Grimshawe, whose household consisted of a remarkably pretty and vivacious boy, and a perfect rosebud of a girl, two or three years younger than he, and an old maid of all work, of strangely mixed breed, crusty in temper and wonderfully sluttish in attire.
      - Doctor Grimshawe's Secret
        [Books (First Lines)]

In an ancient though not very populous settlement, in a retired corner of one of the New England states, arise the walls of a seminary of learning, which, for the convenience of a name, shall be entitled "Harley College."
      - Fanshawe [Books (First Lines)]

We do ourselves wrong, and too meanly estimate the holiness above us, when we deem that any act or enjoyment good in itself, is not good to do religiously.
      - Marble Faun (bk. II, ch. VII) [Religion]

One picture in ten thousand, perhaps, ought to live in the applause of mankind, from generation to generation until the colors fade and blacken out of sight or the canvas rot entirely away.
      - Marble Faun (bk. II, ch. XII) [Painting]

Every crime destroys more Edens than our own.
      - Marble Faun (vol. I, ch. XXIII) [Crime]

It [Catholicism] supplies a multitude of external forms in which the spiritual may be clothed and manifested.
      - Marble Faun (vol. II, ch. XIII) [Symbols]

An unhappy gentleman, resolving to wed nothing short of perfection, keeps his heart and hand till both get so old and withered that no tolerable woman will accept them.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse [Matrimony]

So she poured out the liquid music of her voice to quench the thirst of his spirit.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The Birthmark
        [Singing]

"Here, dearest Eve," he exclaims, "here is food." "Well," answered she, with the germ of a housewife stirring within her, "we have been so busy to-day that a picked-up dinner must serve."
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The New Adam and Eve
        [Eating]

And what is more melancholy than the old apple-trees that linger about the spot where once stood a homestead, but where there is now only a ruined chimney rising our of a grassy and weed-grown cellar? They offer their fruit to every wayfarer--apples that are bitter-sweet with the moral of times vicissitude.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The Old Manse
        [Apples]

Thus we see, too, in the world that some persons assimilate only what is ugly and evil from the same moral circumstances which supply good and beautiful results--the fragrance of celestial flowers--to the daily life of others.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The Old Manse
        [Circumstance]

Some maladies are rich and precious and only to be acquired by the right of inheritance or purchased with gold.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The Old Manse--The Procession of Life
        [Sickness]

Perhaps, moreover, he whose genius appears deepest and truest excels his fellows in nothing save the knack of expression; he throws out occasionally a lucky hint at truths of which every human soul is profoundly though unutterably conscious.
      - Mosses from an Old Manse--The Procession of Life
        [Genius]

Dr. Johnson's morality was as English an article as a beefsteak.
      - Our Old Home--Lichfield and Uttoxeter
        [Morality]

It was a day in early spring; and as that sweet, genial time of year and atmosphere calls out tender greenness from the ground,--beautiful flowers, or leaves that look beautiful because so long unseen under the snow and decay,--so the pleasant air and warmth had called out three young people, who sat on a sunny hill-side enjoying the warm day and one another.
      - Septimius Felton [Books (First Lines)]

The evening before my departure for Blithedale, I was returning to my bachelor-apartments, after attending the wonderful exhibition of the Veiled Lady, when an elderly-man of rather shabby appearance met me in an obscure part of the street.
      - The Blithedale Romance (ch. 1)
        [Books (First Lines)]

Dr. Dolliver, a worthy personage of extreme antiquity, was aroused rather prematurely, one summer morning, by the shouts of the child Pansie, in an adjoining chamber, summoning old Martha (who performed the duties of nurse, housekeeper, and kitchen-maid, in the Doctor's establishment) to take up her little ladyship and dress her.
      - The Dolliver Romance [Books (First Lines)]

Is it a fact--or have I dreamt it--that by means of electricity, the world of matter has become a great nerve, vibrating thousands of miles in a breathless point of time? Rather, the round globe is a vast head, a brain, instinct with intelligence: or shall we say it is itself a thought, nothing but thought, and no longer the substance which we dreamed it.
      - The House of Seven Gables--The Flight of Two Owls
        [Electricity]

What we call real estate--the solid ground to build a house on--is the broad foundation on which nearly all the guilt of this world rests.
      - The House of Seven Gables--The Flight of Two Owls
        [Guilt]

Half-way down a by-street of one of our New England towns, stands a rusty wooden house, with seven acutely peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass, and a huge, clustered chimney in the midst. The street is Pyncheon street; the house is the old Pyncheon-house; and an elm-tree, of wide circumference, rooted before the door, is familiar to every town-born child by the title of the Pyncheon-elm. On my occasional visits to the town aforesaid, I seldom fail to turn down Pyncheon-street, for the sake of passing through the shadow of these two antiquities--the great elm-tree, and the weather-beaten edifice.
      - The House of the Seven Gables
        [Books (First Lines)]

Maule's well, all this time, though left in solitude, was throwing up a succession of kaleidoscopic pictures, in which a gifted eye might have seen foreshadowed the coming fortunes of Hepzibah and Clifford, and the descendant of the legendary wizard, and the village-maiden, over whom he had thrown Love's web of sorcery. The Pyncheon-elm, moreover, with what foliage the September gale had spared to it, whispered unintelligible prophecies. And wise Uncle Venner, passing slowly from the ruinous porch, seemed to hear a strain of music, and fancied that sweet Alice Pyncheon--after witnessing these deeds, this by-gone woe and this present happiness, of her kindred mortals--had given one farewell touch of a spirit's joy upon her harpsichord, as she floated heavenward from the HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES!
      - The House of the Seven Gables
        [Books (Last Lines)]

It is a suggestive idea to track those worn feet backward through all the paths they have trodden ever since they were the tender and rosy little feet of a baby, and (cold as they now are) were kept warm in his mother's hand.
      - The Marble Faun (vol. I, ch. XXI) [Feet]

What a sweet reverence is that when a young man deems his mistress a little more than mortal and almost chides himself for longing to bring her close to his heart.
      - The Marble Faun (vol. II, ch. XV) [Love]

When individuals approach one another with deep purposes on both sides they seldom come at once to the matter which they have most at heart. They dread the electric shock of a too sudden contact with it.
      - The Marble Faun (vol. II, ch. XXII)
        [Contention]


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