GIGA THE MOST EXTENSIVE
COLLECTION OF
QUOTATIONS
ON THE INTERNET
Google
Search GIGA
Loading
Home
Page
GIGA
Quotes
Biographical
Name Index
Chronological
Name Index
Topic
List
Reading
List
Site
Notes
Crossword
Solver
Anagram
Solver
Subanagram
Solver
TOPICS:          A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z
PEOPLE:    #   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z


PHAEDRUS (THRACE OF MACEDONIA)
Roman poet and short story writer
(15 BC - 50 AD)
 << Prev Page    Displaying page 2 of 3    Next Page >> 

To counsel others, and to disregard one's own safety, is folly.
      - [Proverbs]

Unless your works lead to profit, vain is your glory in them.
      - [Proverbs]

Whoever is detected in a shameful fraud is ever after not believed even if they speak the truth.
      - [Fraud]

Wisdom is always an overmatch for strength.
      - [Wisdom]

Witty remarks are all very well when spoken at a proper time: when out of place they are offensive.
      - [Proverbs]

Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of few perceives what has been carefully hidden in the recesses of the mind.
  [Lat., Non semper ea sunt, quae videntur; decipit
    Frons prima multos; rara mens intelligit
      Quod interiore condidit cura angulo.]
      - bk. IV, prol. 5 [Appearance]

Opportunity has hair on her forehead, but is bald behind. If you meet her seize her, for once let slip, Jove himself cannot catch her again.
  [Lat., Occasio prima sui parte comosa, posteriore calva
    Quam si occupasis, teneas elapsum
      Non isse possit Jupiter reprehendre.]
      - bk. V, fable 8 [Opportunity]

Endure this evil lest a worse come upon you.
  [Lat., Hoc sustinete, majus ne neniat malum.]
      - Fables (bk. I, 2, 31) [Evil]

Out of breath to no purpose, in doing much doing nothing. A race (of busybodies) hurtful to itself and most hateful to all others.
  [Lat., Gratis anhelans, multa agendo nihil agens.
    Sibi molesta, et aliis odiosissima.]
      - Fables (bk. II, 5, 3) [Nothingness]

You will soon break the bow if you keep it always stretched.
  [Lat., Cito rumpes arcum, semper si tensum habueris.]
      - Fables (bk. III, 14) [Prudence]

I am in search of a man.
  [Lat., Hominem quaero.]
      - Fables (bk. III, 19, 9) [Man]

He carried and nourished in his breast a snake, tender-hearted against his own interest.
  [Lat., Colubram sustulit
    Sinuque fovet, contra se ipse misericors.]
      - Fables (bk. IV, 18) [Kindness]

For life is nearer every day to death.
  [Lat., Nam vita morti propior est quotidie.]
      - Fables (bk. IV, 25, 10) [Death]

Jupiter has placed upon us two wallets. Hanging behind each person's back he has given one full of his own faults; in front he has hung a heavy one full of other people's.
  [Lat., Peras imposuit Jupiter nobis duas.
    Propriis repletam vitiis post tergum dedit;
      Alienis ante pectus supendit gravem.]
      - Fables (bk. IV, 9, 1) [Faults]

A coward boasting of his courage may deceive strangers, but he is a laughing-stock to those who know him.
  [Lat., Virtutis expers verbis jactans gloriam
    Ignotos fallit, notis est derisui.]
      - Fables (I, 11, 1) [Cowards]

They who delight to be flattered, pay for their folly by a late repentance.
  [Lat., Qu se laudari gaudent verbis subdolis,
    Sera dant peonas turpes poenitentia.]
      - Fables (I, 13, 1) [Flattery]

In a change of government the poor change nothing but the name of their masters.
  [Lat., In principatu commutando civium
    Nil praeter domini nomen mutant pauperes.]
      - Fables (I, 15, 1) [Government]

The smooth speeches of the wicked are full of treachery.
  [Lat., Habent insidias hominis blanditiae mali.]
      - Fables (I, 19, 1) [Deceit]

Whoever has fallen from his former high estate is in his calamity the scorn even of the base.
  [Lat., Quicumque amisit dignitatem pristinam
    Ignavis etiam jocus est in casu gravi.]
      - Fables (I, 21, 1) [Misfortune]

The poor, trying to imitate the powerful, perish.
  [Lat., Inops, potentem dum vult imitari, perit.]
      - Fables (I, 24, 1) [Poverty]

Those who give bad advice to the prudent, both lose their pains and are laughed to scorn.
  [Lat., Consilia qui dant prava cautis hominibus,
    Et perdunt operam et deridentur tupiter.]
      - Fables (I, 25) [Advice]

Every one ought to bear patiently the results of his own conduct.
  [Lat., Sua quisque exempla debet aequo animo pati.]
      - Fables (I, 26, 12) [Patience]

A partnership with men in power is never safe.
  [Lat., Nunquam est fidelis cum potente societas.]
      - Fables (I, 5, 1) [Power]

O that such beauty should be so devoid of understanding!
  [Lat., O quanta species cerebrum non habet!]
      - Fables (I, 7, 2) [Beauty]

True it is that covetousness is rich, modesty starves.
  [Lat., Verum est aviditas dives, et pauper pudor.]
      - Fables (II, 1, 12) [Covetousness]


Displaying page 2 of 3 for this author:   << Prev  Next >>  1 [2] 3

 WWW.GIGA-USA.COM     Back to Top of Page 
The GIGA name and the GIGA logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
GIGA-USA and GIGA-USA.COM are servicemarks of the domain owner.
Copyright © 1999-2016 John C. Shepard. All Rights Reserved.
Last Revised: 2016 June 16
Click > HERE < to report errors