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PLUTARCH
Greek philosopher and biographer
(c. 46 - 120)
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The crowns of kings do not prevent those who wear them from being tormented sometimes by violent headaches.
      - [Station]

The flatterer's object is to please in everything he does; whereas the true friend always does what is right, and so often gives pleasure, often pain, not wishing the latter, but not shunning it either, if he deems it best.
      - [Friends]

The giving riches and honors to a wicked man is like giving strong wine to him that hath a fever.
      - [Honor]

The human heart becomes softened by hearing of instances of gentleness and consideration.
      - [Gentleness]

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited.
      - [Learning]

The omission of good is no less reprehensible than the commission of evil.
      - [Omission]

The talkative listen to no one, for they are ever speaking. And the first evil that attends those who know not to be silent is that they hear nothing.
      - [Talking]

The whole life of man is but a point of time; let us enjoy it, therefore, while it lasts, and not spend it to no purpose.
      - [Enjoyment]

Themistocles replied that a man's discourse was like to a rich Persian carpet, the beautiful figures and patterns of which can only be shown by spreading and extending it out; when it is contracted and folded up, they are obscured and lost.
      - [Speech]

There is never the body of a man, how strong and stout soever, if it be troubled and inflamed, but will take more harm and offense by wine being poured into it.
      - [Wine and Spirits]

There is no perfecter endowment in man than political virtue.
      - [Politics]

Those are greedy of praise prove that they are poor in merit.
      - [Praise]

Those who are greedy of praise prove that they are poor in merit.
      - [Praise]

Thus the greater proportion of mankind are more sensitive to contemptuous language than unjust acts; for they can less easily bear insult than wrong.
      - [Insult]

Time is the wisest of all counselors.
      - [Time]

To be ignorant of the lives of the most celebrated men of antiquity is to continue in a state of childhood all our days.
      - [Biography]

To do an evil action is base; to do a good action without incurring danger is common enough; but it is the part of a good man to do great and noble deeds, though he risks every thing.
      - [Action : Courage]

To find fault is easy; to do better may be difficult.
      - [Faults]

To please the many is to displease the wise.
      - [Popularity]

Under the veil of these curious sentences are hid those germs of morals which the masters of philosophy have afterwards developed into so many volumes.
      - [Apothegms]

We are more sensible of what is done against custom than against nature.
      - [Custom]

We must prune it with care, so as only to remove the redundant branches, and not injure the stem, which has its root in the generous sensitiveness to shame.
      - [Bashfulness]

We ought to give our friend pain if it will benefit him, but not to the extent of breaking off our friendship; but just as we make use of some biting medicine that will save and preserve the life of the patient. And so the friend, like a musician, in bringing about an improvement to what is good and expedient, sometimes slackens the chords, sometimes tightens them, and is often pleasant, but always useful.
      - [Friends]

We ought to regard books as we do sweetmeats, not wholly to aim at the pleasantest, but chiefly to respect the wholesomest; not forbidding either, but approving the latter most.
      - [Books]

What can they suffer that do not fear to die?
      - [Death]


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