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THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY
English author, historian, statesman and poet
(1800 - 1859)
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Few of the many wise apothegms which have been uttered, from the time of the seven sages of Greece to that of poor Richard, have prevented a single foolish action.
      - [Apothegms]

Finesse is the best adaptation of means to circumstances.
      - [Finesse]

Footprints of history on the pages of time.
      - [Monuments]

Genius is subject to the same laws which regulate the production of cotton and molasses.
      - [Genius]

Good by reason of its exceeding badness.
      - [Critics]

Great minds do indeed react on the society which has made them what they are; but they only pay with interest what they have received.
      - [Greatness]

Grief, which disposes gentle natures to retirement, to inaction, and to meditation, only makes restless spirits more restless.
      - [Grief]

Half-knowledge is worse than ignorance.
      - [Knowledge]

He who, in an enlightened and literary society, aspires to be a great poet, must first become a little child.
      - [Poetry]

Highest among those who have exhibited human nature by means of dialogue stands Shakespeare. His variety is like the variety of nature,--endless diversity, scarcely any monstrosity.
      - [Shakespeare]

How can man die better,
  Than facing fearful odds
    For the ashes of this fathers
      And the temples of his gods?
      - [Proverbs]

"I am always nearest to myself," says the Latin proverb.
      - [Selfishness]

If ever Shakespeare rants, it is not when his imagination is hurrying him along, but when he is hurrying his imagination along.
      - [Shakespeare]

If the Sunday had not been observed as a day of rest during the last three centuries, I have not the slightest doubt that we should have been at this moment a poorer people and less civilized.
      - [Sabbath]

In after-life you may have friends--fond, dear friends; but never will you have again the inexpressible love and gentleness lavished upon you which none but a mother bestows.
      - [Mothers]

In employing fiction to make truth clear and goodness attractive, we are only following the example which every Christian ought to propose to himself.
      - [Fiction]

In taste and imagination, in the graces of style, in the arts of persuasion, in the magnificence of public works, the ancients were at least our equals.
      - [Ancients]

In the modern languages there was not, six hundred years ago, a single volume which is now read. The library of our profound scholar must have consisted entirely of Latin books.
      - [Literature]

In the plays of Shakespeare man appears as he is, made up of a crowd of passions which contend for the mastery over him, and govern him in turn.
      - [Shakespeare]

It is certain that satirical poems were common at Rome from a very early period. The rustics, who lived at a distance from the seat of government, and took little part in the strife of factions, gave vent to their petty local animosities in coarse Fescennine verse.
      - [Satire]

It is possible to be below flattery as well as above it. One who trusts nobody will not trust sycophants. One who does not value real glory will not value its counterfeit.
      - [Flattery]

It is the age that forms the man, not the man that forms the age.
      - [Greatness]

It was before Deity embodied in a human form walking among men, partaking of their infirmities, leaning on their bosoms, weeping over their graves, slumbering in the manger, bleeding on the cross, that the prejudices of the synagogue, and the doubts of the academy, and the pride of the portico, and the fasces of the lictor, and the swords of thirty legions were humbled in the dust.
      - [Christ]

Knowledge advances by steps, and not by leaps.
      - [Knowledge]

Language is the machine of the poet.
      - [Language]


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